“Today’s Special” Movie Trailer


“Today’s Special” Movie Trailer

TODAY’S SPECIAL is a heartwarming comedy with a culinary flavor, inspired by Aasif Mandvi’s Obie Award winning play “Sakina’s Restaurant.” Samir (Aasif Mandvi, The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, THE LAST AIRBENDER) is a sous chef who dreams of becoming the head chef at an upscale Manhattan restaurant. When he is passed over for a promotion he impulsively quits and lets his co-worker Carrie (Jess Weixler, TEETH) know that he intends to go to Paris and apprentice under a master French chef. Dreams must be put aside though after his father Hakim (Harish Patel, RUN FAT BOY RUN) has a heart attack and Samir is forced to take over Tandoori Palace, the nearly bankrupt family restaurant in Jackson Heights. Samir’s relationship with his parents and his heritage is immediately put to the test. He has been estranged from his father since the death of his older brother, and his mother Farrida, (played by legendary cookbook writer and actor, Madhur Jaffrey), is consumed with finding a wife for her remaining son. While Samir is being forced to forsake his dreams, he is desperately trying to master Indian cooking to salvage the family business. Luckily, he crosses paths with Akbar, a taxi driver, passionate chef, and worldly raconteur (portrayed by the icon of Indian cinema, Naseeruddin Shah, MONSOON WEDDING). Akbar inspires Samir and teaches him to trust his senses more than recipes; to stop measuring his life, and to start truly living it. With Akbar’s guidance, Samir has a chance to rediscover his heritage and his passion for life through the enchanting art of cooking Indian food.

Editor’s Corner 101.20

The Round and the Furry – When Good Letters Go Bad.

“My spelling is Wobbly. It’s good spelling but it Wobbles,
and the letters get in the wrong places.”
…A.A.Milne

Scribe smallA fragile day, today – last week still weighs heavily – and I was tempted to throw the corner open to you readers in a sort of Q & A: you ask me your most pressing editing questions and I provide pithy bon mots in return. However, the writer in me seems to have a hard time settling for such a terse exposition.

So, a story.

When I was a kid, I was a notoriously bad speller. Oh, I could memorize word lists for tests, but back when I was nine, the rules and vagaries of English spelling seemed as nonsensical as a Hatter’s high tea. As much as I loved roaming through dictionaries, etymology was an undiscovered country to this youthful traveler, one I didn’t knowingly explore for a few years yet. (A failing of our education system, perhaps, to rely on rote rather than reason.)

spell-check-fail1

Fast forward several decades – irony running ahead of the wind – and I now help fill the household coffers by editing crossword puzzles. (I can think of a few teachers laughing their asses off over that!) I have taken advantage of time and experience and am a better, if somewhat indifferent, speller. I am also an occasionally errant typist, prey to dyslexic fingers and fur-laced keyboards. (Thank you, kids!)

sanji

This does not even begin to touch on the unexplained mystery of the eye/brain connection which leads us to see words as we expect them to be, not necessarily as they are. I find this most true when proofing my own work; I know the words inside and out and so my mind fills in blanks, automatically switches inverted letters, and glides over –ance when it should be –ence, because, well, the mind is funny that way.

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Since nothing screams “Unprofessional!” like a text littered with typos and orthographic errors, the writing gods put their heads together and gifted us poor scriveners with spellcheck. Voila! Proofreading for dummies! All those pesky blunders red-lined and auto-corrected. Nothing could be simpler.

Except of course, nothing is ever that simple.

First, the standard spellcheck database is limited. This leads to erroneous markups or, conversely, if your spelling is truly atrocious, letter-salad flagged, but scant help provided re alternatives. In other words, you’re on your own. (Most word-processing dictionaries can be expanded – something which, as a fantasist, I do frequently, especially with esoterica and exotic names, so easy to make up but not always to remember. But, damn it Jim! We’re writers not lexicographers!)

spelling-crop

More troublesome for some – and not really the fault of the program – is the fact that English is a whimsical language, rife with homonyms and frequently confused/misused words, for which spellcheck simply doesn’t suffice.

their/there/they’re
ade/aid/aide
who’s/whose
its/it’s
then/than
vane/vein/vain
alter/altar
affect/effect
bare/bear
discreet/discrete
sheer/shear
rain/rein/reign
council/counsel
rout/route/root
plane/plain
loathe/loath
grisly/grizzly
advice/advise
device/devise
being/been
led/lead
sear/seer
bread/bred
desert/dessert

The list goes on and on….

So what do you do when “I rote a tail about a plain full of grisly bares en root to the dessert” passes through spellcheck with flying colors?

You beet your Brest, pull your hare (but not by his ears), and remember that computers are only tulles.

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Tools work best when we users knows our craft. And the best tools are always in our heads. Read your work slowly and with care. Don’t hesitate to drag out your dictionary, handy grammar guide, even a knowledgeable friend or two, if you are stuck. This is the picky-nit part of writing. Love it, hate it, but do it diligently, starting with the a spellcheck from top to bottom, front to back. For, despite flaws in the system, it is still a great proofing aid. Then, if you can, find fresh eyes to read your work through again. And again….

Next week I am going to do that Editor’s Corner Q & A. I’ll be on line all next Tuesday, so drop by. Ask me your questions, I’ll tell ewe no lyes. Oops![THIS IS FROM THE ORIGINAL POSTING—DOES NOT APPLY FOR NEXT TUESDAY]

I will try to respond to messages as I am able. At times it may be in the form of a post or a direct email response. Guests who post, I will forward messages addressed to them. It is up to them how they decide to correspond. — Shawn MacKENZIE – MacKenzie’s Dragonsnest

“Madness”

MADNESS

Hopeless bleeds
Haunts shadows
Mind loses calmness
Raw bones stripped clean
Grinds the deadness
Shadows in the dark
Pretend fear away

Unsuccessful the voices
Breathe stolen images
Nightmares’ leftovers
Circle around
Before the grave
Quiet the sound
Words echo
When spoke aloud

Lost in a mine field
Blood explodes
Owns the end
Sanity rejected
Sucks down
The rough terrain
Rips life away
Shreds existence

Dread madness
Releases uncertainty
The light surrenders
Anxiety overwhelms
Fear’s strangers
Aloneness within
Consumes Universe
While Nothingness holds court

© jk 2015

walking amongst the darkness (c) jk 2015

walking amongst the darkness (c) jk 2015

O Brave New World: Book Launch in PJs –

the secret keeper:

An excellent book that teaches about writing and editing. The following is a quote from the post and a connection back to the original.

“Every day, a writer weaves passionately through a forest of choices both large and small. For, beyond the spark of an idea and the ensuing blood, sweat, and tears, writing is all about choices. This is the heart of editing….”

Originally posted on MacKENZIE's Dragon's Nest:

It is the eve of the vernal equinox and here in Vermont we are still flirting with single digits on the back of bitter winds. When better to stay inside, snuggly surrounded by cats, and launch a book in comfort?

CoverYES

After tackling the learning curve of e-text idiosyncrasies and cleaving the Gordian knots in my stomach, I am thrilled to announce that Red Line/Blue Line: Essays from the Editor’s Corner has hit the e-book runway. It is available in a text edition through Smashwords [Nook, Apple, and a variety of generic platforms], and, in an illustrated Kindle edition.

Regular visitors to the Dragon’s Nest may be familiar with my Editor’s Corner pieces. Since their initial blog appearance, they have been spruced up, augmented, re-worked – in short, edited – for publication. All thirty-six essays are now together in one easy-access volume. And, thanks to the sage input…

View original 299 more words

“Letters to a Young Poet” [Part XIV of XXIX]

rainer maria rilke letters to a young poet COVER

“Letters to a Young Poet”

by Rainer Maria Rilke

Part XIV of XXIX

Post by Jennifer Kiley

Post Sunday 22nd March 2015

RILKE Painting blond

(14th week)

“In this
there is no measuring
with time,
a year
doesn’t matter,
and ten years
are nothing.
Being an artist
means:
not numbering
and counting,
but ripening
like a tree,
which doesn’t
force its sap,
and stands confidently
in the storms
of spring,
not afraid
that afterward
summer
may not come.
It does come.
But it comes
only to those
who are patient,
who are there
as if eternity
lay before them,
so unconcernedly silent
and vast.
I learn it
every day
of my life,
learn it
with pain
I am grateful for:
patience
is
everything!”

1 home large photo

One of Rainer Maria Rilke’s Homes

Dvorak, New World Symphony – 2nd Mvt Part 2,

Dublin Philharmonic, Conductor Derek Gleeson

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