“Mrs. Peppercorn’s Magical Reading Room” – A Short Film

i heart short films
“Mrs. Peppercorn’s Magical Reading Room” – A Short Film
Post Created by Jennifer Kiley
Created 4/20/2014 April
Posted on Friday 15th August 2014
I <3 SHORT FILMS

SPECTACULAR.
A TREAT.
AS A PERSON ABOVE THE AGE OF A CHILD
I LOVE STORIES.
I LOVE TO HAVE STORIES
TOLD TO ME.
I LOVE TO TELL STORIES
TO MYSELF.
I LOVE TO TELL STORIES
TO MY ANIMALS.
I LOVE TO TELL STORIES
TO GHOSTS.
I LOVE TO TELL STORIES
TO OTHER BEINGS
WHO INHABIT THE EARTH.

STORIES ARE WONDERFUL.
EXCITING TO HEAR.
EXCITING TO SEE.
THE CREATION OF FILM
WAS AN ABSOLUTE GENIUS
INVENTION.
TO BE ABLE
TO CREATE STORIES
AND PLACE THEM
ONTO A MEMORY.
A MEMORY
THAT CAN BE SHARED
OVER AND OVER.
FILLING THE VIEWER
WITH ENJOYMENT
SATISFACTION
TEARS
REFLECTIONS
REALIZATIONS
TRUTHS
FANTASIES
REALITIES
ALL AND NOTHING
ENJOYABLE VISIONS
MEANING OR
NO SPECIFIC MEANING
BEAUTY
VISIONS
SYMBOLS
SPEAKING IN CRYPTIC
UNDERSTANDING

READ
WRITE THE WORDS
AS SOON AS YOU SEE THEM
HEAR THEM
SAY THEM
KNOW THEM
UNDERSTAND THEM

MOVING FEELINGS
GENERATED FROM
A FANTASY STORY
THAT AWAKENS MEMORIES
OF DREAMS
FROM A MISTY CHILDHOOD
WITHOUT CLARITY

BRILLIANT SHORT FILM
OF HIGH QUALITY
LOVE THE CHILD ELOISE
A MUST SEE FILM
FOR CHILDREN
AND ESPECIALLY
THOSE CHILDREN
STUCK IN ADULT
SHAPED BODIES

LET US OUT
GET INTO THE UNFOLDING
OF THE MAGIC

YOU WILL LOVE THIS FILM
IF YOU ARE A CHILD
WHO BELIEVES IN LOVE
AND HAPPILY EVER
BEFORE MIDDLE
AND AFTER ALL

A MOMENT
SOME PLACE IN TIME
A ROUGH CARD
GETS SLIPPED
INTO THE DECK

SOMEONE SORTS
THE TAROT WRONG
AND THERE IT IS
UPSIDE DOWN CARDS
SENDING
AN AWKWARD INFUSION
OF NEGATIVITY

INTO THE MIDST
OF THE COURSE
OF OCEAN WAVES
CRASHING
INTO THE SAND
PULLING IT OUT
MIXING IT ALL UP

CHANGE AIR
CHANGE SAND
CHANGE TIME
AS THE SAND TUMBLES
INTO THE LOWER HALF
OF AN HOUR GLASS

STREAM OF CONSCIOUSNESS
IS WHAT HAPPENS
WHEN AN INTELLIGENT CHILD
TAKES PAINTS
AND DESIGNS THEM
INTO WHAT THE CHILD SEES
AS SOMETHING SPECIAL
AND HAS A SPECIALNESS
AROUND WHAT IT SPECIFIES
AS ITS IDENTITY
OR ABSTRACT CONFUSION

BUT ONLY CONFUSING
FOR THOSE WHO DON’T LIKE
THE FEELING OF LETTING
THEIR MIND HAVE FREEDOM
TO EXPRESS ITSELF
WITHOUT EXCEPTION
OR INTERRUPTION
OR GUIDANCE TOWARD
A PRE-DETERMINED DESTINATION
FREEDOM
NO BOUNDARIES
BETWEEN MIND & DOING
PREJUDICE IS CAUSED
BY LOSS OF FAERY DUST
ONE SPRINKLE ALL IS CURED
BUT DO THOSE
WHO HATE DIFFERENCE
WANT TO CHANGE
OR HAVE
FAERY DUST TOUCH THEM?
AND THE WORLD
CONTINUES FOR NOW

end of stream @ 9:34am

“Mrs. Peppercorn’s Magical Reading Room” – A Short Film – 26min. 9sec.

BEST VIEWED FULL SCREEN IN HD WITH SOUND TURNED UP…

“Mrs Peppercorn’s Magical Reading Room” – A Short Film. BRILLIANT!!! It Gets 5 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 out of 5 <3 s

Multi Award Winning short film by writer/director Mike Le Han. mrspeppercornthemovie.co.uk

A magical/fantasy short film set in a remote Cornish fishing village. Eloise a nine year old adopted girl takes solace in her books when she moves to the creepy village of Black Lake, until she meets Mrs Peppercorn the bookshop owner who was said to have been dead for over nine years.

Read what Variety had to say about the film variety.com/article/VR1118035497?refCatId=13

Director: Mike Le Han,
Director Of Photography: Stephen Murphy,
Writers: Helen Le Han & Mike Le Han,
Production Designer: Helen Le Han

Editor: Mark Talbot Butler,
Composer: Kevin Kliesch,
VFX Supervisor: Ben Haworth,
Sound Supervisor: Alex Joseph

Special Edition: Maya Angelou R.I.P.

special edition day any
Maya Angelou R.I.P.

Special Edition

Post Created by Jennifer Kiley

Post Wednesday 28th May 2014

 

Poet, author Maya Angelou dies at 86

maya angelou insightful

Hillel Italie
May 28, 2014
Filed 03:59 PM EST

NEW YORK (AP) — Maya Angelou, a modern Renaissance woman who survived the harshest of childhoods to become a force on stage, screen, the printed page and the inaugural dais, died Wednesday, her son said. She was 86.

Angelou’s son, Guy B. Johnson, said the writer died at her home in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, where she had been a professor of American studies at Wake Forest University since 1982.

Tall and regal, with a deep, majestic voice, Angelou defied all probability and category, becoming one of the first black women to enjoy mainstream success as an author and thriving in virtually every artistic medium. The young single mother who worked at strip clubs to earn a living later wrote and recited the most popular presidential inaugural poem in history. The childhood victim of rape wrote a million-selling memoir, befriended Malcolm X, Nelson Mandela and the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., and performed on stages around the world.

An actress, singer and dancer in the 1950s and 1960s, she broke through as an author in 1969 with “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings,” which became standard (and occasionally censored) reading, and was the first of a multipart autobiography that continued through the decades. In 1993, she was a sensation reading her cautiously hopeful “On the Pulse of the Morning” at President Bill Clinton’s first inauguration. Her confident performance openly delighted Clinton and made the poem a best-seller, if not a critical favorite.

FOR COMPLETE ARTICLE GO TO THIS LINK ON HUFFPOST

The Following Video is Maya Angelou speaking for herself.

Here, I Give You, Maya Angelou

Maya Angelou [Director's Cut] – Cole Haan

A Writer’s Diary: Virginia Woolf — Part #2

a writer's diary
Virginia Woolf — Part #2
Excerpts from Virginia Woolf
Created by Jennifer Kiley
Created DATE 2014
Posted Sunday 9th March 2014
A WRITER’S DIARY

Virginia Woolf 1

Virginia Woolf

A Writer’s Diary 
Virginia Woolf – Part #2

Leonard Woolf
Virginia’s husband
Writes
In the introduction
To
A Writer’s Diary

The diary is too personal
To be published as a whole
During the lifetime
Of many people
Referred to in it.

It is
I think
Nearly always a mistake
To publish extracts
From diaries or letters

Particularly
If the omissions
Have to be made
In order to protect
The feelings
Or reputations
Of the living.

The omissions
Almost always distort
Or conceal
The true character
Of the diarist
Or letter-writer

And produce
Spiritually
What an Academy picture
Does materially

Smoothing out
The wrinkles
Warts
Frowns
And asperities.

At the best
And even unexpurgated
Diaries give a distorted
Or one-sided portrait
Of the writer

Because

As Virginia Woolf
Herself remarks

Somewhere
In these diaries

One gets
Into the habit
Of recording
One particular
Kind of mood

Irritation
Or misery,
Say

And of not
Writing one’s diary
When one is feeling
The opposite.

The portrait is
Therefore
From the start
Unbalanced

And
If someone
Then deliberately
Removes
Another characteristic

It may well
Become
A mere
Caricature.

— Leonard Woolf
[Virginia's Husband]

Virginia Woolf's Monk's House Garden

Virginia Woolf’s Monk’s House Garden

virginia woolf 3

Virginia Woolf

Erik Satie: Gnossienne No. 1, 2, 3

Editor’s Corner 101.37: All Good Things….

shawn mackenzie's editor's corner day monday
Editor’s Corner 101.37
All Good Things….
Written by Shawn MacKenzie
Originally Posted on MacKenzie’s Dragonsnest in 2013

Reposted on ‘the secret keeper’
Monday 3rd February 2014

101.37

All Good Things….

There’s a trick to the ‘graceful exit.’
It begins with the vision to recognize when a job,
a life stage, or a relationship is over — and let it go.
…Ellen Goodman

Scribe smallStories, films, lives – all things come to a close. Sometimes neatly, sometimes not. And so, after nine months, I am bringing the Editor’s Corner to what I hope is a neat and graceful end.

Over the past thirty-seven weeks, we have covered topic both minute and sweeping, and yet, in the end, I find it fitting to return to the beginning. To our words.

I originally wrote the following back in March of this year as a guest piece for Karen Sanderson’s blog. I now amend, update, and present it to you as my parting thoughts. My thanks to Niamh and Plum Tree for this forum, and to all who have traveled with me on this writer’s journey. Enjoy.

P1010342

You Are Your Words

We humans are creatures of custom. It frames our existence and structures our lives. In the course of my daily custom, once I begin to feel the dream-webs lift from my mind, I brew a fresh pot of tea, play with the kittens, and allow my thoughts to mosey along paths both cosmological and mundane, reasoned and stochastic. The other day, I started thinking about words.

Magical, mystical, wickedly creative, oh, the glorious power of words and we who wield them.

“In the beginning was the Word…and the Word was God.”

This is not just a Judeo-Christian notion. The Popol Vuh – Mayan Book of Creation – speaks of how Sovereign Plumed Serpent (who later became Quetzlcoatl) and Heart of Sky came together at the beginning of time:

“…And then came his [Heart of Sky’s] word, he came to Sovereign Plumed Serpent, here in the blackness, in the early dawn…. they joined their words, their thoughts….And then the earth arose because of them, it was simply their word that brought it forth….”

Quetzlcoatl - Vampire Princess

Quetzlcoatl by Vampire Princess

Now this notion (naturally) draws me down a whimsically syllogistic rabbit hole: The Word is divine; the divine create with words. Writers create with words; writers are divine.

Hey, makes sense to me.

Ok, we writers may not be divine, but we do cloak ourselves in Creator’s motley as comfortably as jeans and broadcloth. Mind blowing for gods to shape the universe in the round of a word, yet that’s what we do every day. Out of the chaos of random thought, the void of the blank page, we create whole worlds and the beings who live in them. Earthsea, Darkover, Yoknapatawpha County, OZ and East Egg, Wonderland and Wessex – the list of literary terrae nova are legion. Even places we think we know, like Richard Wright’s Chicago or Edith Wharton’s New York, are, in authorial hands, transformed into alien landscapes ripe for exploration.

Wizard of Earthsea - Torture Device

Wizard of Earthsea by Torture Device

And so we string one word after another, counting our hours from phrase to sentence to paragraph to tome. We weave tales of myth and wonder and supernal genesis. For words are creative. With them we name things and by naming them bring them into being. They are active, breathing life into those named things, making them romp and fly and do handsprings through the treetops. They are descriptive, coloring and shaping the world that it might be recognized and marveled at in all its beauty and strangeness. And that is without even touching upon the mind and heart, the emotional power of words. The power that reaches out across our inherent aloneness and makes people feel and think and remember, even change their lives. For words are lash and cradle, warming spark and unholy conflagration. They heal and nurture, wound and kill.

Complex stuff. God stuff.

Sue Blackwell book sculpture

Sue Blackwell book sculpture

Which brings me to a story. More memoir than fancy (though there are tangential Dragons); just a little something I thought I’d share.

Two years ago, my book, The Dragon Keeper’s Handbook, was making its way into print. In anticipation of this event, my publisher invited me to the Book Expo of America in New York. Sign some ARCs (Advanced Reader Copies), generate book buzz, and spend two days in Gotham with all stripe of book folk – authors, publishers, agents, librarians. Commercialism be damned, for a writer, what could be more delicious?

Not to mention the swag!

A convention neophyte, I was quite unprepared for the booty laid out like Smaug’s hoard, just there for the taking. From simple promotional bookmarks and house totes, to signed copies of the year’s (hopefully) hottest titles, one was limited only by one’s interests, greed, and in the case of acquiring a major author’s John (or Jane) Hancock, no small amount of stamina. Even though I was hobbling about on a broken leg at the time, I returned home with several bags – now weekly filled with groceries – and a far from shabby passel of books. For all that, my favorite BEA keepsake was from the folks at the American Heritage Dictionary of English Language: a modest white 6” x 4” oval magnet, adorned in black Arial with the deceptively simple gnome: You Are Your Words.

URYourWords

Every morning since, I rub the sleep from my eyes and focus on this reminder of how I am defined by the words in my life. They are my tools, my paint and canvas, soil and seeds. I shape them, play with them, with luck make them croon like an armadillo and pirouette on the wings of a damselfly. They represent me to the world, my ideas and dreams. Whether tripping across page or tongue, they have consequences, so I must choose them with care. They are my children sent into the world, and I am responsible for them, in all their beauty or ugliness.

I am my words; my words are me.

As logophile, whimsical scribe, exacting editor, wielder of words.

As a writer.

I give you my word.

1219782482yLCfpg

Happy Holidays, my friends.
Write well.

The Last Edition of the Editor’s Corner To Go To the Archives Click On the Highlighted “Editor’s Corner”

Saving Mr. Banks

cinema theoretica
Saving Mr. Banks
Saving Mr. Banks Trailer
Notations by Jennifer Kiley
Created 23rd January 2014
Posted On Friday 31st January 2014
CINEMA THEORETICA

movies-saving-mr-banks-poster

The books and the film are different. We are talking about Mary Poppins. Most adaptations end up going into changes. Different mediums. Learn to allow the transition into your purview. When very young, I read P.L. Travers books written about Mary Poppins.

savings mr banks  the real mary poppins

The real Mary Poppins played by Rachel Griffith in Mary Poppins

When the movie came out, I never really connected the books to the film. Same name, Mary Poppins, but not the character I remember in anyway. I love them both but differently. They were the good moments I remember being a child. Reading and seeing movies.

saving mr banks p.l at desk walt talking to her

Saving Mr Banks Emma Thompson as P.L. Travers and Tom Hanks as Walt Disney

Movies were on the TV, not in the cinema. Not until I was at least approaching the age to babysit. Then I went to see the Beatles and Mary Poppins and two other Julie Andrews films she had released during that same time period.

saving-mr-banks walt & travers at disneyland

Saving Mr Banks Walt Disney and P.L. Travers at Disneyland

I was hooked on Mary Poppins from the books. But then it transferred over to being Julie Andrews as Mary Poppins, and I adored her. There was always adventure in the books and of course in the movie, overflowing in abundance.

saving-mr-banks carousel p.l. & walt

Saving Mr Banks P.L. Travers on Carousal. Walt Disney won his bet to get her on a ride.

P.L Travers felt Walt Disney took the darker side of Mary Poppins out of her character. At the beginning of the film, Saving Mr. Banks, precedes Walt Disney even having the rights to use P.L. Travers’ Mary Poppins. From all the talk, it seems Mr. Disney took advantage of P.L. Travers need for money. She had little power to negotiate but did it for real and really didn’t want to have to give. Disney knew somehow he would get what he wanted even though it seemed at time, P.L Travers was going to reject any deal. This was in her heart to do, to refuse. Plus a great deal was riding on Walt Disney sealing the deal. He promised his daughters he would make their favorite children’s story of Mary Poppins into a film. It took 20 years.

saving mr banks p.l. not happy with disney take on m.p.

Saving Mr Banks Emma Thompson as P.L. Travers not happy with Walt Disney’s take on Mary Poppins

I am looking forward with excitement, to see Saving Mr. Banks. Emma Thompson as P.L. Travers seems a real hoot. My three favorite things that came out of all this. That would be Emma Thompson, Mary Poppins and her creator P.L. Travers, and Julie Andrews. Julie Andrews being a nanny saved my childhood. She played my favorite nannies, Mary Poppins and Maria in The Sound of Music. For myself as a child, I would have loved having a nanny over my parents any day. No questions.

saving mr banks walt disney

Saving Mr Banks Tom Hanks as Walt Disney

The story of the take over of Mary Poppins by the Powerful and Famous Walt Disney.

SAVING MR. BANKS TRAILER

Saving Mr. Banks Trailer

saving-mr.-banks pl travers

Saving Mr Banks Emma Thompson as P.L. Travers

PG-13, 2 hr.

Drama, Comedy

Emma Thompson …………P.L. Travers

Tom Hanks …………….Walt Disney

Colin Farrell …………Robert Goff Travers

Bradley Whitford ………Don DaGradi

Paul Giamatti …………Ralph

Jason Schwartzman ……..Richard Morton Sherman

Ruth Wilson …………..Margaret Goff

B.J. Novak ……………Robert Sherman

Kathy Baker …………..Tommie

Rachel Griffiths ………Aunt Ellie

Annie Rose Buckley …….Ginty

Original Photo of the Walt Disney film Mary Poppins

Original Photo from the Walt Disney Film Mary Poppins with Julie Andrews & Dick Van Dyke during Step In Time number.

Editor’s Corner 101.34 — Brass Tacks in a Box of Paper Clips

shawn mackenzie's editor's corner day monday
Editor’s Corner 101.34 — Brass Tacks in a Box of Paper Clips
Written by Shawn MacKenzie
Originally Posted on MacKenzie’s Dragonsnest

Reposted on ‘the secret keeper’
Reposted on Monday 13th January 2014

101.34
Brass Tacks in a Box of Paper Clips

Trifles make perfection, and perfection is no trifle.
― Michelangelo Buonarroti

Scribe smallA 14th-century traveler parks his camel on the banks of the Euphrates. The water is wide and easy and teeming with fish. But what sort? Would our traveler use a line or a net – perhaps his bare hands? How would he cook his catch? Does it matter?

The short answer is, “Yes!”

Euphrates

Euphrates

As storytellers, we laud our ability to build worlds whole and breathe life into pen-and-ink characters. We ask our readers to believe at times the most extraordinary things. For this to work, we have to remember that stranger our tales, the more they must be grounded in something familiar.

I write fantasy. I dance around dragons and unicorns, kitsune and mystical yeti crabs. I explore unknown planets and long-forgotten civilizations. Nothing pleases me more than when people say they believe my Dragons are real, when they can imagine walking through Dragon Country and being surprised and delighted by the scaly habitants. While some of this comes from my personal conviction about Dragons, that alone would fall flat if not backed up by plausible science, history, and cultural anthropology.

River time

In other words, even our most imaginative fictions – especially our most imaginative fictions – must have an intimate relationship with facts. And establishing that relationship demands research.

This is not always easy. Even in the Internet age, when libraries and museums from every corner of the world are literally at our fingertips, getting details about time and place, costume and manner, spot on can be harder than one might think. Right now, I have been pulling my hair trying to solve the question of that 14th-century angler. As an editor of crossword puzzles, I pride myself on being able to research anything, but this has been giving me fits.

r_01_____________________________________________t400

True, I can always go generic. A nice fish grilled over an open fire whets the appetite regardless of species. And, for a while, I was so discouraged about the lack of available information, I seriously thought about going that route. Then, this afternoon (Monday afternoon), I had one of those marvelous “Eureka!” moments that elicited an audible sigh of relief from my near-tonsured pate.

050302

In the midst of lists of species names (in Latin, of course), cultural and environmental histories, and free-association googling, I came across a wonderful story about the sacred carp of the Euphrates, a barbel fish not only revered but also known to grant wishes! I had discovered an indigenous fish both tasty and full of fanciful possibilities. For my purposes it was perfect.

As helpful as this was to me, carp or bluegill, the point I am trying to make in my round about way, is that you don’t have polar bears chasing Robert Falcon Scott across the Ross Ice Shelf or have your heroine catch a train from Kings Cross to St. Ives. Eros – Anteros, to some – looks down on Piccadilly Circus,

eros

and, as Bohemian as Montmartre is, it’s actually on the Right Bank of the Seine, not the Left. (The stepped hills are a dead giveaway.)

Terrace-of-a-Cafe-on-Montmartre-(La-Guinguette)

Little things in a story’s bigger picture, but the sort of things which give veracity, especially when dealing with actual places, events, and/or people. And veracity makes people believe. The last thing you want is to ruin the spell of your story by a nagging error of fact. It would be as bad as if a Rolex flashed from Chuck Heston’s wrist as he chased Stephen Boyd around the hippodrome.

BEN HUR

So, put in the time, do the research, and double check Wikipedia with an independent source. In the end, even if you have such a superfluity of information that you bury most of it in your personal notes, it will still infuse your prose. It will still matter.

Dissection

Editor’s Corner 101.33 — But What Happens?

shawn mackenzie's editor's corner day monday
Editor’s Corner 101.33
But What Happens?
Originally Posted by Shawn MacKenzie
On MacKenzie’s Dragonsnest 22nd October 2013

View Past Issues at MacKenzie’s Dragonsnest Archive

Reposted on ‘the secret keeper
Monday 6th January 2014

But What Happens?

Story is honorable and trustworthy;
plot is shifty, and best kept under house arrest.
― Stephen King

Dragon ScribeLast week my writers’ group happened to coincide with Halloween, and whether it was the holiday or the fact that it was unseasonably warm and pouring, our little intrepid band was remarkably light on pages. OK, truthfully, they were nonexistent. Hey, shit happens, right? So we spent a couple of hours talking – always a pleasure with intelligent, creative people – about politics, films, and, of course, the books on our respective nightstands and kindles. I’d just finished reading an extraordinary collection of short stories, “The Witch and Other Stories,” by one of my favorite writers, Anton Chekhov.

chekhov

One of my fellows asked, “What are they about?”

A proper question – the sort of thing we writers have to answer every time we craft a query/cover letter or get button-holed in a conference elevator – but one which often gives me fits. More and more, we seem to live in a literal and literary worlds where something has to happen every page, paragraph, even line. Stillness, reflection, these are strains we seldom allow our turn-pagers. (You can imagine my delight when Alice Munro got the Nobel this year – a testament to the power of stillness.)

Uncle Vanya

Uncle Vanya

I thought for a moment and gleefully – must be my Russian blood – couldn’t come up with an answer. Chekhov and plot have always had a tangential relationship. His plays – The Cherry Orchard, Uncle Vanya, The Seagull – are two-hour explorations of life, love, and survival. Disarmingly simple.

The good doctor’s stories are the same, even more so. People come together, move apart, and in between, they survive as best they can. What happens? Life.

In our high-octane world that demands action every five minutes, is that enough? Absolutely.

Macbeth - the whole plot in a handful of witchy lines.

Macbeth – the whole plot in a handful of witchy lines.

Of course some will say that low-action stories are best left to “literary” fiction. And, from a publishing perspective there is some truth to that. After all, a mystery is about solving a crime; a romance is about winning and losing love, and most fantasy books these days are 600 pages of swords, sorcery, and noble quests.

Every agent or publisher will insist you have to be able to sell your story, to distill the plot into 50 words or less. Better yet, into one sentence. But what does that really convey? Moby-Dick is about a guy obsessed with killing the whale that cost him his leg. Right?

moby_dick_book_sculpture_by_wetcanvas-d5v6yll

We all need ‘plot’ but in the end, it is just the skeleton of the work – the connect-the-dots image begging for lines to give it form. In the end it is not the ‘what’ of a telling, it is the ‘how.’ It is not the distance of the journey, it is the people you meet along the way. It is the words.

“Remember,” Ray Bradbury wisely wrote, “Plot is no more than footprints left in the snow after your characters have run by on their way to incredible destinations. Plot is observed after the fact rather than before. It cannot precede action. It is the chart that remains when an action is through. That is all Plot ever should be. It is human desire let run, running, and reaching a goal. It cannot be mechanical. It can only be dynamic. So, stand aside, forget targets, let the characters, your fingers, body, blood, and heart do.”

badger-footprints