Why People Need Poetry

tell me a story

Why People Need Poetry

TED Talk: Stephen Burt

Post Created by Jennifer Kiley

Post Thursday 25th September 2014

 


Why People Need Poetry - TED Talk: Stephen Burt

Published on Jun 4, 2014

“We’re all going to die — and poems can help us live with that.” In a charming and funny talk, literary critic Stephen Burt takes us on a lyrical journey with some of his favorite poets, all the way down to a line break and back up to the human urge to imagine.

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Special Edition: Maya Angelou R.I.P.

special edition day any
Maya Angelou R.I.P.

Special Edition

Post Created by Jennifer Kiley

Post Wednesday 28th May 2014

 

Poet, author Maya Angelou dies at 86

maya angelou insightful

Hillel Italie
May 28, 2014
Filed 03:59 PM EST

NEW YORK (AP) — Maya Angelou, a modern Renaissance woman who survived the harshest of childhoods to become a force on stage, screen, the printed page and the inaugural dais, died Wednesday, her son said. She was 86.

Angelou’s son, Guy B. Johnson, said the writer died at her home in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, where she had been a professor of American studies at Wake Forest University since 1982.

Tall and regal, with a deep, majestic voice, Angelou defied all probability and category, becoming one of the first black women to enjoy mainstream success as an author and thriving in virtually every artistic medium. The young single mother who worked at strip clubs to earn a living later wrote and recited the most popular presidential inaugural poem in history. The childhood victim of rape wrote a million-selling memoir, befriended Malcolm X, Nelson Mandela and the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., and performed on stages around the world.

An actress, singer and dancer in the 1950s and 1960s, she broke through as an author in 1969 with “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings,” which became standard (and occasionally censored) reading, and was the first of a multipart autobiography that continued through the decades. In 1993, she was a sensation reading her cautiously hopeful “On the Pulse of the Morning” at President Bill Clinton’s first inauguration. Her confident performance openly delighted Clinton and made the poem a best-seller, if not a critical favorite.

FOR COMPLETE ARTICLE GO TO THIS LINK ON HUFFPOST

The Following Video is Maya Angelou speaking for herself.

Here, I Give You, Maya Angelou

Maya Angelou [Director's Cut] – Cole Haan

The Wednesday Poetry Corner with Dr. Mary Annie AV

the secret keeper:

“Do not stand at my grave and weep, I am not there – I do not sleep. I am the thousand winds that blow…” Mary Frye [1932] One of my favorite poems. Dr. Mary Annie A.V. did a lovely & meaningful presentation on death & life. Meeting the end of one and entering the beginning another. Which is which? It is the ultimate Question. Tagore states in this post “…When one dies one lives.” I wonder myself if this is true. We all know death is in front of our time here. No one is ever really told when, even if one is gravely ill, the time is not given to us in an exact moment. Some say they feel it approaching. It is a grand philosophical question, poets, artists, writers, songs, express death, love, life, probably the most popular content of most art, these three subjects, but death is the one that haunts us the most. Reading this post has opened my mind to thinking about it in a poetic & philosophical way. It is something feared & expected & needs someday to be faced, in some manner or maybe not for some people. Is it better to be surprised or to be the poet and examine it through divine words of comfort & see it as an uplifting end to pain & a beginning of life as we all are meant to experience it fully. Great post. Love that you brought Mary Annie A.V. to us Niamh Clune. She has a very unique way of expressing such a delicate subject to many. Her choices in poetry and poets are so familiar to me. I feel all will enjoy & find a comfort in reading all that she has offered to us. by Jk the secret keeper Jennifer Kiley ps. Two poets I didn’t mention that Mary Annie A.V. writes about are Emily Dickinson and Sylvia Plath, who, also, write about death. “Dying / Is an art, / like everything else. / I do it exceptionally well. / I do it so it feels like hell. / I do it so it feels real. / I guess you could say I’ve a call./

Originally posted on Plum Tree Books Blog:

It is with great pleasure that I introduce a wonderful new Indian voice to our Wednesday Corner. Dr. Mary Annie A.V. writes with depth and passion about the subject of Death ~ a subject that has long-fascinated poets and philosophers throughout history. Thank you Mary for being our guest on the plum tree today and for sharing your profound thoughts on a subject that is often not spoken of.

Speculating…

By Mary Annie A.V.

My earliest memories are those of reciting Mother Goose’s Nursery rhymes, which perhaps influenced me to write my first prize winning poem ‘My brother’, at the age of five. However, I guess it is in the Psalms of the Bible that I by-hearted, that I found my sense of language, rhythm and the sheer magic of words. I have always been fascinated by life, death and eternity. The mystery of life and death and eternity makes…

View original 435 more words

Favorite Top Ten Sylvia Plath Quotes

Favorite Top Ten Sylvia Plath Quotes
Written by Sylvia Plath
Post Created by Jk the secret keeper
Illustrated by j. kiley
Post Created on Sunday 18th August 2013
Posted On Sunday 25th August 2013
A Writer’s Word

Fertility --- Artist Allen  3264x2397

Fertility — Artist Allen

Quote #10

“I write only because
There is a voice within me
That will not be still.”

— Sylvia Plath

Quote #9

“Is there no way out
of the mind?”

— Sylvia Plath

Quote #8

“The worst enemy to creativity
is self-doubt.”

— Sylvia Plath

Quote #7

“I shut my eyes
and all the world drops dead;
I lift my eyes
and all is born again.”

— Sylvia Plath

Quote #6

“I talk to God
but the sky is empty.”

— Sylvia Plath

Pollock 32   733x432

Pollock 32

Quote #5

“Perhaps when we find ourselves
wanting everything,
it is because we are dangerously close
to wanting nothing.”

— Sylvia Plath

Quote #4

“I lean to you,
numb as a fossil.
Tell me I’m here.”

— Sylvia Plath

Quote #3

“With me, the present is forever,
and forever is always shifting,
flowing, melting.
This second is life.
And when it is gone it is dead.
But you can’t start over
with each new second.
You have to judge by what is dead.
It’s like quicksand…
hopeless from the start.”

— Sylvia Plath

Quote #2

“When at last you find someone
to whom you feel you can pour out your soul,
you stop in shock at the words you utter —
they are so rusty, so ugly,
so meaningless and feeble
from being kept
in the small cramped dark
inside you so long.”

— Sylvia Plath

Quote #1

“I must be lean & write
& make worlds beside this
to live in.”

— Sylvia Plath

Pollock 1 1949   864x529

Pollock 1 1949

New Poetry Release: SEVEN DAYS OF ASHES ~Hymns to the Holocaust by Alan Patrick Traynor

the secret keeper:

Alan Patrick Traynor wrote a brilliant selection of poems in his new book Seven Days of Ashes. These are times to never forget ever. Alan Patrick takes you their by bravely visiting the past himself, experiencing the excruciation pain of the holocaust. Blood for ink, he etched on paper the words you will want to read and absorb into your own soul. Never must the message he brings through his words, ever be forgotten. Alan Patrick brings the truth to your minds, traveling back along the lines of his poems to places locked in its place, cemented in times always needing to be remembered. The memories are carried in his words so truthfully and feelingly. You will never be the same after you visit the past through the rawness of his words as he reveals the truth through his eyes. Jk the secret keeper

Originally posted on After Nyne:

Screen Shot 2013-08-09 at 14.15.11

SEVEN DAYS OF ASHES ~Hymns to the Holocaust is the latest collection from Irish poet Alan Patrick Traynor.

Traynor has travelled immensely throughout Europe and the United States for a good half of his life, and has gathered some extraordinary skills in how he breaks into the stark meter of suffering, with a music that will haunt his words and wounds deep into your deepest heart.

‘The book was initially inspired by watching a short video documentary about the Holocaust artist Felix Nussbaum, and then began a life of its own, that gave birth to a horrific poetic viewpoint like a timeless lens into the spirit of the Holocaust.  To me, it’s as if the poems were written from an eye-witness account from the dead victims’ says Traynor, deeply affected by his subject.

The seven poems are deep veridicous spears from the soul of the poet, and are…

View original 252 more words

Allen Ginsberg: Poet Buddhist Howl

tell me a story
Allen Ginsberg:Poet Buddhist Howl
Notations by Jennifer Kiley
Interview Face to Face BBC 1995
Quotes In Broken Form by Jennifer Kiley
Created 4th August 2013
Posted Thursday 8th August 2013
TELL ME A STORY

Allen Ginsberg interviewed by Jeremy Isaacs in 1995 for the BBC

1995 – Face to Face with Jeremy Isaacs: An Interview with Allen Ginsberg Part One

1995 – Face to Face with Jeremy Isaacs: An Interview with Allen Ginsberg Part Two

1995 – Face to Face with Jeremy Isaacs: An Interview with Allen Ginsberg Part Three

Listening to Allen Ginsberg was a Transcendental Experience of Heightened Awareness.

Allen Ginsberg: An Honest Interview Filled with Insightful Stories. An Inspiring Talk. Finishing With the Most Moving Lyrical Poem Written by Allen’s Father and in This Interview Set to Music. Allen Sings ‘Father Death Blues’ to Close Out the Interview. I Listened to the Song Until I Was Able to Completely Write Down All the Lyrics. It Is Amazing and to Hear Allen Ginsberg Sing It Blows Me Away and I Think It Will Do the Same for Anyone with Soul and Heart. The Whole Interview Is Worth the Time It Takes to Listen. Enlightenment Is One Possible Reward.

“I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness…starving, mystical naked…too sentimental…changed it to starving hysterical…naked. “
— Allen Ginsberg

Howl, was it an angry poem?
“A gesture of sympathy for a friend in trouble…full devouring God…angry…anguish…ultimate accusation is the mind…the all devouring God…our own mind.”
— Allen Ginsberg

Candor in poetry.
“I very consciously follow my mentor, Walt Whitman. Early version of Leaves of Grass…he hoped Americans would develop into a condition of more candid…Manipulative frankness…he was candid about his emotions…he wasn’t candid about his physical relationships…there was a lineage where someone had slept with Walt Whitman…so there is a lineage of gossip…he couldn’t proclaim his physical love but certainly their was an expression of his emotional love.”
— Allen Ginsberg

“Walt Whitman wasn’t able to proclaim his physical love in his poetry.”
— Allen Ginsberg

He was convinced a lobotomy was necessary. So he signed the papers.
“I signed for my mother’s lobotomy…I felt tremendous guilt…Had to deal with her irrationality…Difficult to get to love…Longing for feminine bliss at the same fear of it…and so I am gay in a sense.”
— Allen Ginsberg

Mother in sane episodes.
“She claimed to be the secretary of Patterson, N.J communist party itself…Great strikes with John Reed in 1918…Has a great labor history.”
— Allen Ginsberg

“Hoover, who was a closet gay, destroyed the labor unions in America because they were originally formed by left wing pinkos to form a left in America…The mafia moved into the vacuum and were protected by Hoover. So there is no left in America, only the right and the middle.”
— Allen Ginsberg

“Had something like a visionary experience or an hallucination…the endlessness of the skies…50 year ago Italian workman made all the scroll work on the architecture of New York…Buddhism…what was real or not real…ended up arrested…choice of going to jail or the mad houses…it was a situation where I was alone…had an affair with Neal Cassidy…William Burroughs was a close friend for many years but wasn’t around…read others and read Blake…sick rose…sunflower…hearing Blake’s voice outside of his own body…reciting…latent projection…ah, sunflower weary of time…seeking after that great golden climb…aspire where my sunflower wishes to grow…the heavens were endless…or the sky was endless, I would say.”
— Allen Ginsberg

Did that help you become a poet? You used drugs after that to try to recapture that experience.
“I used dried leaves…It wasn’t natural…At the time I was eating vegetables. I wasn’t eating meat…Leading a solitary life…Freedom is another word for nothing more to lose…My heart was open in a sense at the time.”
— Allen Ginsberg

Drugs…Does it permanently help you to perceive an expanded universe?
“An ordinary mind that the universe is endless…awaken you to an ordinary mind…the psychedelic experience…Peyote…natural mushroom…a panoramic awareness…the natural experience…can be catalized by the psychedelic experience…but would recommend that people learn a meditative experience…following your breath…notice when your mind wanders…do it every day…since 1970…8 hours for weeks at a time…now I use other styles…quieting the mind…I tried something called ecstasy…I was remembering an old enemy…his transformation that I had someone to define my limits…psychedelics…how they were able to apply them in ordinary mind.”
— Allen Ginsberg

“My father was a lyric poet…I learned it at his knee…learned rhyme…he wrote a poem ‘father death blues’ I read it at his funeral…a caddish…met my mother later 1983 on as a bag lady where I had a chance to take care of her which I didn’t when she was alive…they were both agnostics [parents]…there is some problem with an absolute hierarchical…Jewishness passed by…”

— Allen Ginsberg

Are you a writer or a performer…best read on the page or read out loud?
“Vernacular communication…I am primarily a writer…there is a dimension of sound…It is possible to vocalize to have my poems understood more rapidly…I am not a performer…”
— Allen Ginsberg

Has your writing has a political effect?
“Talked to Dylan. He knew he had power but knew it was miniscule compared to the small number who own the mass media? It would be very difficult for a poet to overcome that kind of power…but if you need the historical truth of what people think inside…the poet tells the unsubjective truth…the government is of words…they are writing prose…their language is shifty…the poet can say what they really think.”
— Allen Ginsberg

Who is the love of your life?
“A number of people…I use to have one a day…had someone I loved for 40 years…I was in love with Kerouac…Neal Cassidy…with whom I had a funny affair that lasted over 20 years..any fantasy I had as an adolescent.”

— Allen Ginsberg

As you get older what do you most fear?
“Cancer…pain…I have a short one line poem ‘Get use to your body. Forget you were born. Suddenly, you’ve got to get out.’ How to approach death…how to leave the body…”
— Allen Ginsberg

Both Dylan and Kerouac think you’re a con-man. What did they mean by that?
“The trickster in them…it’s in reference to the trickster hero…last time I saw Dylan he asked me about Blake…Jokes …Characteristic of them.”
— Allen Ginsberg

How would you like us to remember you?
“The poem ‘Father Death Blues’…please let him go…continue your celebration…[singing---fruition of his Buddhist training] hey father death I’m flying home…hey poor man you’re all alone…hey old daddy I know where I’m going…father death don’t cry anymore…momma’s there underneath the floor…brother death please mind the store…old auntie death I hear your groans…old uncle death I see your bones…oh sister death how sweet your moans…oh children deaths go breathe your breaths… sobbing breaths so ease your deaths…pain is gone tears ate the rest…genius death your heart is done…lover death your body’s gone…father death I’m coming home…guru death your words are true…teacher death I do thank you for inspiring me to sing this blues…Buddha death I wake with you…Dharma death your mind is new…song of death we’ll work it through…suffering is what was born…ignorance made me forlorn…tearful truths I cannot scorn…father’s breath once more farewell…birth you gave was no faint pill…my heart is still as time will tell.”
— Allen Ginsberg

Random Transcription—so much more in interview… by Jennifer Kiley

No Face No Fingers

No Face No Fingers
Post Created by Jennifer Kiley
Post Created Tuesday 23rd July 2013
Poem by Alan Patrick Traynor
Sunday 28th July 2013
A WRITER’S WORD

seven days of ashes book cover 1

Plum Tree Books is proud to announce the publication of

Alan Patrick Traynor’s first book of poetry.
Seven Days Of Ashes
Hymns to the Holocaust

Alan writes clouds, ether, fire and death. You will smell his words. He sets the page alight, breaking the rules. He is the new voice of poetry! …”Is Alan a mystic who speaks for the dead? He gives shape, immediacy and a new meaning to a reality that still haunts us collectively…” — Niamh Clune

— Niamh Clune, CEO and Publisher of Plum Tree Books, blog: on the plum tree, poet, writer and all around Renaissance woman, author of Orange Petals in a Storm and The Coming of the Feminine Christ.

Alan Patrick, your poems are solemn and speak the poetic version of the truth. I have read the words you put to paper, this book is a masterpiece on the highest level. A challenging and diverse group of so many people to represent. I do believe you have met this calling in direct and honest words with poetic revelation and justice.

The Nazis perpetrated this horror. It is a sickening feeling to think or even imagine being in those situations of death.

I am so moved by your words-both of you, Niamh Clune as the publisher who had the foresight to present the rebel and genius of the poet Alan Patrick Traynor. Congratulations to you and Niamh Clune with hopes of success and wishes that you reach many with your words of truth. — By Jennifer Kiley

burning violin 1

The following poem THE FLAG THAT KNOWS NO DREAM by Alan Patrick Traynor is not part of the collection, but it resonates. Jk

the flag that knows no dream (c) alan patrick traynor

dragonfly expressionism 1

Escher Bond On Union

Escher Bond On Union

'NIGHT' ElieWiesel 1

Holocaust — A Deception of Truth