“Pulp Fiction”

Jules: There’s a passage I got memorized. Ezekiel 25:17. “The path of the righteous man is beset on all sides by the inequities of the selfish and the tyranny of evil men. Blessed is he who, in the name of charity and good will, shepherds the weak through the valley of the darkness, for he is truly his brother’s keeper and the finder of lost children. And I will strike down upon thee with great vengeance and furious anger those who attempt to poison and destroy My brothers. And you will know I am the Lord when I lay My vengeance upon you.”

Pulp Fiction – Directed by Quentin Tarantino

Storyline

Jules Winnfield and Vincent Vega are two hitmen who are out to retrieve a suitcase stolen from their employer, mob boss Marsellus Wallace. Wallace has also asked Vincent to take his wife Mia out a few days later when Wallace himself will be out of town. Butch Coolidge is an aging boxer who is paid by Wallace to lose his next fight. The lives of these seemingly unrelated people are woven together comprising of a series of funny, bizarre and uncalled-for incidents. Written by Soumitra

Special Edition: Maya Angelou R.I.P.

special edition day any
Maya Angelou R.I.P.

Special Edition

Post Created by Jennifer Kiley

Post Wednesday 28th May 2014

 

Poet, author Maya Angelou dies at 86

maya angelou insightful

Hillel Italie
May 28, 2014
Filed 03:59 PM EST

NEW YORK (AP) — Maya Angelou, a modern Renaissance woman who survived the harshest of childhoods to become a force on stage, screen, the printed page and the inaugural dais, died Wednesday, her son said. She was 86.

Angelou’s son, Guy B. Johnson, said the writer died at her home in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, where she had been a professor of American studies at Wake Forest University since 1982.

Tall and regal, with a deep, majestic voice, Angelou defied all probability and category, becoming one of the first black women to enjoy mainstream success as an author and thriving in virtually every artistic medium. The young single mother who worked at strip clubs to earn a living later wrote and recited the most popular presidential inaugural poem in history. The childhood victim of rape wrote a million-selling memoir, befriended Malcolm X, Nelson Mandela and the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., and performed on stages around the world.

An actress, singer and dancer in the 1950s and 1960s, she broke through as an author in 1969 with “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings,” which became standard (and occasionally censored) reading, and was the first of a multipart autobiography that continued through the decades. In 1993, she was a sensation reading her cautiously hopeful “On the Pulse of the Morning” at President Bill Clinton’s first inauguration. Her confident performance openly delighted Clinton and made the poem a best-seller, if not a critical favorite.

FOR COMPLETE ARTICLE GO TO THIS LINK ON HUFFPOST

The Following Video is Maya Angelou speaking for herself.

Here, I Give You, Maya Angelou

Maya Angelou [Director’s Cut] – Cole Haan

No One Expects…

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
No One Expects…
Written by Jennifer Kiley
Painting by Jk McCormack
Created on 29th January 2014
Posted on Saturday 22nd February 2014
POETRY IN TONE

White Rabbit – Jefferson Airplane

In the universe,
There are things that are known
And things that are unknown,
And in between there are doors.
-— William Blake

No One Expects…
By Jennifer Kiley
29th January 2014

Serious moments
Coercion in practice
Pulling me closer
Building my trust
Hearts crushing
Veins crashing
Got to move on now

Doors slamming shut
You closed me out
Cold is your blood
Left me lying there
Sinking in the cold
Wet mud
The quicksand
With no gravity

No one expects love
To rust
To turn in to
Distrust
Must I think of you?
Everywhere I look
You haunt me there
You stare
With blank eyes
You don’t care

A mirage is seen
A message echoing
Inside a recording
Shadows following
Words whispering
Sounds out loud

Are you there?
Did you ever care?
Were you visiting?
And just resisting
Trying emotions
Wrestling with honesty?

Can’t bear your shadow
Near me
Testing me
Trying to steal
Enticing away
Those I love

Sending her
To stalk me
To break me down
Find what’s touching off
Thoughts inside my brain

Your vibration
Your excitation
Has it been easy
Trying to destroy me
You so easily
Implore me

What can you find?
What’s left?
In my mind
The rest is crazy
Gone mad
You made me

Like you had
Gone mad
Only bad
It’s sad
What was your destiny?

To be small
Nothing big enough
At all
You won’t reach those heights
You’ll never get there
And I don’t care

Is it meant
for me instead?
Believing
Isn’t wrong
Dreaming

Thoughts working
Their way in the mind
Thinking alone
For the self

Dreaming the dream
Is a gift to the soul
For giving life

© JkM 2014

Eye of Tigyr Burning Bright - Artist Jk McCormack (c) JkM 2014

Eye of Tigyr Burning Bright – Artist Jk McCormack (c) JkM 2014

John Steinbeck: Six Tips on Writing

a writer's word - day title sundayJohn Steinbeck: Six Tips on Writing
Post Created by Jk the secret keeper
Illustrated by j. kiley
Post Created On Saturday 21st September 2013
Posted On Sunday 22nd September 2013

A Writer’s Word
john steinbeck

John Steinbeck Tip #1

 

Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.

 

John Steinbeck Tip #2

 

Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.

 

John Steinbeck Tip #3

 

Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.

 

John Steinbeck Tip #4

 

If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.

 

John Steinbeck Tip #5

 

Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.

John Steinbeck Tip #6

 

If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.

steinbeck perfect good

Steinbeck issued the following statement after receiving the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1963,

 “If there is a magic in story writing, and I am convinced there is, no one has ever been able to reduce it to a recipe that can be passed from one person to another. The formula seems to lie solely in the aching urge of the writer to convey something he feels important to the reader. If the writer has that urge, he may sometimes, but by no means always, find the way to do it. You must perceive the excellence that makes a good story good or the errors that makes a bad story. For a bad story is only an ineffective story.” — John Steinbeck

 

John Steinbeck — Pulitzer Prize winner, Nobel laureate, author of “East of Eden,” gave an excellent interview published in the Fall 1975 issue of The Paris Review.

[Thank You to Brain Pickings]

10 Pieces of Great Advice For Writing

tell me a story
10 Pieces of Great Advice For Writing
Written by Joyce Carol Oates
Two Interviews with Joyce Carol Oates
Her Thought on Many Subjects Related to Writing
Joyce Carol Oates Speaks about Her Latest Novel ‘The Accursed’
Discovered @ Soundcloud 10th September 2013 by j. kiley
A Visit with Joyce Carol Oates
Created 7th & 10th September 2013
Posted Thursday 12th September 2013
TELL ME A STORY

Joyce Carol Oates ‏@JoyceCarolOates 12pm 18th July 2013

Joyce Carol Oates is a writer and writing personality.
A prolific tweeter, the 75 year old put out 10 pieces
of great advice for writing on her Twitter account.

Check them out below.

1) Write your heart out.
Joyce Carol Oates ‏@JoyceCarolOates 12pm 18th July 2013

2) The first sentence can be written only after the last sentence
has been written. FIRST DRAFTS ARE HELL. FINAL DRAFTS, PARADISE.
Joyce Carol Oates ‏@JoyceCarolOates 12pm 18th July 2013

3) You are writing for your contemporaries–not for Posterity.
If you are lucky, your contemporaries will become Posterity.
Joyce Carol Oates ‏@JoyceCarolOates 12pm 18th July 2013

4) Keep in mind Oscar Wilde: “A little sincerity is a
dangerous thing, and a great deal of it is absolutely fatal.”
Joyce Carol Oates ‏@JoyceCarolOates 12pm 18th July 2013

5) When in doubt how to end a chapter, bring in a man with a gun.
(This is Raymond Chandler’s advice, not mine. I would not try this.)
Joyce Carol Oates ‏@JoyceCarolOates 12pm 18th July 2013

6) Unless you are experimenting with form–gnarled,
snarled & obscure–be alert for possibilities of paragraphing.
Joyce Carol Oates ‏@JoyceCarolOates 12pm 18th July 2013

7) Be your own editor/ critic. Sympathetic but merciless!
Joyce Carol Oates ‏@JoyceCarolOates 12pm 18th July 2013

8) Don’t try to anticipate an ideal reader–or any reader.
He/ she might exist–but is reading someone else.
Joyce Carol Oates ‏@JoyceCarolOates 12pm 18th July 2013

9) Read, observe, listen intensely!–as if your life depended upon it.
Joyce Carol Oates ‏@JoyceCarolOates 12pm 18th July 2013

10) Write your heart out.
Joyce Carol Oates ‏@JoyceCarolOates 12pm 18th July 2013

joyce carol oates poster with tweats

Joyce Carol Oates Interview — KQWD Forum

“Joyce Carol Oates is the rarest of commodities, an author modest about her work,” wrote Robert Phillips in The Paris Review in 1978. Though she has since won the National Humanities Medal, been nominated for a Pulitzer, and written dozens more books and short stories (including one published in the magazine this week: http://www.newyorker.com/fiction/feat…), she remains unusually self-effacing. When we visited her earlier this month, at her home in New Jersey, she told us, “I haven’t the faintest idea what my royalties are. I haven’t the faintest idea how many copies of books sold, or how many books that I’ve written. I could look these things up; I have no interest in them. I don’t know how much money I have. There are a lot of things I just don’t care about.”

Joyce Carol Oates is the author of many distinguished books in several genres, she is one of America’s most versatile contemporary writers. In addition to numerous novels and short story collections, she has published poetry, plays, literary criticism, and the book-length essay On Boxing.

Joyce Carol Oates — KCWS -Bookworm — Discussing Her Novel ‘The Accursed

Book Description: ‘The Accursed’
Publication Date: March 5, 2013

A major historical novel from “one of the great artistic forces of our time” (The Nation)—an eerie, unforgettable story of possession, power, and loss in early-twentieth-century Princeton, a cultural crossroads of the powerful and the damned

Princeton, New Jersey, at the turn of the twentieth century: a tranquil place to raise a family, a genteel town for genteel souls. But something dark and dangerous lurks at the edges of the town, corrupting and infecting its residents. Vampires and ghosts haunt the dreams of the innocent. A powerful curse besets the elite families of Princeton; their daughters begin disappearing. A young bride on the verge of the altar is seduced and abducted by a dangerously compelling man–a shape-shifting, vaguely European prince who might just be the devil, and who spreads his curse upon a richly deserving community of white Anglo-Saxon privilege. And in the Pine Barrens that border the town, a lush and terrifying underworld opens up.

When the bride’s brother sets out against all odds to find her, his path will cross those of Princeton’s most formidable people, from Grover Cleveland, fresh out of his second term in the White House and retired to town for a quieter life, to soon-to-be commander in chief Woodrow Wilson, president of the university and a complex individual obsessed to the point of madness with his need to retain power; from the young Socialist idealist Upton Sinclair to his charismatic comrade Jack London, and the most famous writer of the era, Samuel Clemens/Mark Twain–all plagued by “accursed” visions.

An utterly fresh work from Oates, The Accursed marks new territory for the masterful writer. Narrated with her unmistakable psychological insight, it combines beautifully transporting historical detail with chilling supernatural elements to stunning effect.

This wonderful micro-documentary from the New Yorker offers a peek inside Oates

A Visit With Joyce Carol Oates

Joyce Carol Oates (born June 16, 1938) is an American author and the Roger S. Berlind ’52 Professor in the Humanities with the Program in Creative Writing at Princeton University, where she has taught since 1978.

Oates has also written under the pseudonyms “Rosamond Smith” and “Lauren Kelly.”

“Anything I’ve encountered in the world is never as interesting as a novel…
What you find out there is never as exciting as your own creation.”
— Joyce Carol Oates