“The future is slow coming”

“The future is slow coming” by Benjamin Booker

Directed by James Lees

A short film featuring the songs ‘Slow Coming’ & ‘Wicked Waters’ from Benjamin Booker.

PRESS:

NPR – “A kind of mash-up of Selma and Beasts of the Southern Wild, with Booker as an unwilling time traveler recalling both the segregated Deep South and current controversial police actions.”

Full Articlenpr.org/blogs/therecord/2015/03/11/392203348/benjamin-booker-faces-the-past

DIY Mag – “One emotional juggernaut of a video”

Far Out Magazine – “A music video for ‘Slow Coming’ and ‘Wicked Waters’ it deals effectively with both aspects of the short film and music promo genres, being both cinematic and emphatic in delivery. Pulling at heart strings and delivering the sobering message like a slap to the face.”

“San Andreas”

the secret keeper:

If you are into disaster films “San Andreas” is the Disaster film to knock out the competition. This one will beat them all. jk

Originally posted on the secret keeper:

Since I can remember there has always been talk
of California falling into the sea & California Earthquakes.

Is this movie an extreme pre-enactment
of the future for the San Andreas Fault?

I want to see “San Andreas”
b/c I am feeling the vibration
this may be the Disaster Film
to Beat Out All Disaster Films.


San Andreas (2015) – The Rock (Dwayne Johnson) Trailer 3 [HD]

Dwayne Johnson stars in SAN ANDREAS, in theaters May 29, 2015.

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After the infamous San Andreas Fault finally gives, triggering a magnitude 9 earthquake in California, a search and rescue helicopter pilot (Dwayne Johnson) and his estranged wife make their way together from Los Angeles to San Francisco to save their only daughter.

But their treacherous journey north is only the beginning. And when they think the worst may be over…it’s just getting started.

The film also…

View original 112 more words

“Aquarius”

the secret keeper:

In case you missed the Premiere of “Aquarius” here is a look at the trailer & some information on the playground & what to expect. jk

Originally posted on the secret keeper:


Aquarius – Murder, Madness, Manson (Preview)

Los Angeles, 1967. Revisit the case of a generation. Special two-hour premiere of Aquarius, starring David Duchovny, Thursday May 28 at 9/8c on NBC. David Duchovney returns to Series TV. Also, he is soon to return with Gillian Anderson in new episodes of “The X-Files.”

ABOUT AQUARIUS
It’s 1967 and the era of free love, drug experimentation and the Vietnam War is in full effect. When the teenage daughter of a respected lawyer goes missing, LAPD Detective Sam Hodiak starts asking around. Needing the help of someone they will trust, he partners with rebellious undercover cop Brian Shafe, a man who’s more comfortable rolling a joint than patrolling a beat. It’s not long before they stumble upon a small-time cult leader seeking out vulnerable women to join his cause.

From there, they follow this man’s trail down a rabbit hole of drugs, sex, murder…

View original 52 more words

“San Andreas”

Since I can remember there has always been talk
of California falling into the sea & California Earthquakes.

Is this movie an extreme pre-enactment
of the future for the San Andreas Fault?

I want to see “San Andreas”
b/c I am feeling the vibration
this may be the Disaster Film
to Beat Out All Disaster Films.


San Andreas (2015) – The Rock (Dwayne Johnson) Trailer 3 [HD]

Dwayne Johnson stars in SAN ANDREAS, in theaters May 29, 2015.

http://facebook.com/sanandreasmovie
http://twitter.com/sanandreasmovie
http://instagram.com/sanandreasmovie
http://sanandreasmovie.com

After the infamous San Andreas Fault finally gives, triggering a magnitude 9 earthquake in California, a search and rescue helicopter pilot (Dwayne Johnson) and his estranged wife make their way together from Los Angeles to San Francisco to save their only daughter.

But their treacherous journey north is only the beginning. And when they think the worst may be over…it’s just getting started.

The film also stars Carla Gugino (“Night at the Museum,” TV’s “Entourage”), Alexandra Daddario (“Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters,” TV’s “True Detective”), Ioan Gruffudd (“Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer”), Archie Panjabi (TV’s “The Good Wife”), Hugo Johnstone-Burt (Australian TV’s “Home and Away”), Art Parkinson (TV’s “Game of Thrones”) and Oscar nominee Paul Giamatti (“Cinderella Man,” “Sideways”).

“San Andreas” was shot on location in The Gold Coast and Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, and in Los Angeles and San Francisco.
The film is slated to open in theatres in both 3D and 2D on Friday, May 29, 2015.

Pre-order the soundtrack featuring Sia’s “California Dreamin'” now[Beautifully Haunting Version of the MaMas & the PaPas song]: http://smarturl.it/sanandreas_i

Editor’s Corner 101.31

Heroes Large – Heroes Small

No, what he didn’t like about heroes was that they were usually suicidally gloomy when sober and homicidally insane when drunk.
…Terry Pratchett

Scribe smallNo matter how hard we might try – and believe me I do – we cannot avoid protagonists – our literary heroes, male or female.

Truth is, I’m not too keen on heroes, per se. They are essential but really, what can you say? Your hero is your main character, the person whose story you are telling. Simple. They are characters sometimes more acted upon than acting, but always real enough that we cheer when they triumph and shed a tear when they die. We willingly, eagerly invest hours of precious time – oh, how precious our time is these days! – in their lives, following them wherever their journeys lead.

This 3-D imaging is the essence of the writer’s craft; we have explored it before – most recently in the past couple of weeks when I discussed minor characters and villains. (If you want to learn more, read Joseph Campbell’s brilliant The Hero With a Thousand Faces or the more writer-friendly take on it, Christopher Vogler’s The Writer’s Journey – you couldn’t ask for better guides along the heroic arc.)

campbell2

Today I want to look at things in a slightly different way. I want to talk about the changing face of our literary heroes.

In the old days of dichromatic storytelling, heroes, like their villainous counterparts, were characters of extremes. They were always virtuous, noble, and brave, intelligent but not cunning (too many sinister connotations to that word), willing to take responsibility for their actions and, if needs be, sacrifice themselves for the greater good. They were aspirational – the sort of people upon whom we pinned all our best hopes, convinced that they could not only bear them, but soar under their weight.

1amwords_hero

Yes, they had their flaws, usually picked from amongst the cardinal sins. Hubris was a big one with the Greeks (Oedipus, Cadmus, just about every major player in the Iliad and Odyssey). Also big in the ancient Epic of Gilgamesh and the Mahabharata. In the latter, the Pandava and the Kaurava are both exceedingly proud, but the Pandava are the heroes because they learn from their weakness and are humbled; the Kaurava remain proud to the end).

mahabharata_vittorio_mezzogiorno_peter_brook_010_jpg_uhei

Love – or its extremes, jealousy and lust – is another common flaw (Lancelot, Orlando); and greed (Bilbo Baggins). For a classic protagonist, what counts is not that they are flawed, but that they learn about themselves, their weaknesses, and triumph despite them. This introspection and growth is as important, if not more so, as the slaying of any rampaging legion of orcs. (No slaying Dragons here!)

These are our neat heroes, the ones who come through with every hair in place and nary a speck of blood on their crisp white shirt (or burnished armor).

Galahad-L

But the modern world is as messy for heroes as it is for villains. Such pristine white hats no longer resonate as they once did.

As with villains, I believe the sea change for protagonists came with Shakespeare. Hamlet, Prospero, Titus Andronicus, Lear, Cleopatra, Isabella, Richard II…. Complicated characters who, while protagonists, are not always aspirational. Shakespeare allowed his main characters to straddle the line between good and evil. They could be cruel and petty, indecisive and vengeful.

titus

Titus Andronicus

They were, to my thinking, among our first literary antiheroes – the predecessors of Heathcliff and Emma Bovary, Holden Caulfield and Lisbeth Salander.

mara-rooney-the-girl-with-the-dragon-tattoo

Girl with the Dragon Tattoo

But can we take this too far? In our effort to find relatable, sympathetic protagonists, have we made them too much like ourselves, and in the process, lost something vital? Today, just doing the right thing – standing up against bullies or bigotry, calling 911 for a stranger in trouble – qualifies you for a medal, even sainthood. Our heroes, like ourselves, are diminished. Not that we shouldn’t say “thank you” to every good Samaritan or person of conscience out there – but are they worthy of novel treatment?

Yes, we are all heroes in our own life stories, but fiction – even the most intimate fiction (like the stories of recent Nobelist Alice Munro) – is not life. It is, if not bigger, then certainly more concentrated. Our protagonists have to rise to the challenge, to satisfy that aspect of our natures that craves heroes ten-feet tall.

Protagonists - Gleeson

Protagonists – Gleeson

Some will say that is what genre books are for – fantasy and mystery and horror, that they are the new home to classic protagonists. Within their pages we get reluctant everymen and women thrust into being more than they ever imagined possible. They transform from being “us” to being what we can only dream of being and, as we tag along or the vicarious ride, we get our requisite dose of clean, aspirational heroism.

Can we strike a balance between these classic (genre) heroes and everyday mensch (literary) protagonists? Perhaps. But first we must find that balance in ourselves. And remember that the hallmark of a protagonist is not leaping tall buildings or bringing peace to the Universe. It is seeing change up ahead and choosing to embrace it. It is riding the wings of the Dragon when everyone else demands you thrust a blade through her heart.

Weyrworld - Pern Dragonriders

Weyrworld – Pern Dragonriders

The real hero is always a hero by mistake; he dreams of
being an honest coward like everybody else.
…Umberto Eco

I will try to respond to messages as I am able. At times it may be in the form of a post or a direct email response. Guests who post, I will forward messages addressed to them. It is up to them how they decide to correspond.   — Shawn MacKENZIE – MacKenzie’s Dragonsnest

“I can believe…”

Charles Vess Instructions for Neil Gaiman

Charles Vess Instructions for Neil Gaiman

“I can believe things that are true and things that aren’t true and I can believe things where nobody knows if they’re true or not.

I can believe in Santa Claus and the Easter Bunny and the Beatles and Marilyn Monroe and Elvis and Mister Ed. Listen – I believe that people are perfectable, that knowledge is infinite, that the world is run by secret banking cartels and is visited by aliens on a regular basis, nice ones that look like wrinkled lemurs and bad ones who mutilate cattle and want our water and our women.

I believe that the future sucks and I believe that the future rocks…

I believe that all politicians are unprincipled crooks and I still believe that they are better than the alternative. I believe that California is going to sink into the sea when the big one comes, while Florida is going to dissolve into madness and alligators and toxic waste.

I believe that antibacterial soap is destroying our resistance to dirt and disease so that one day we’ll all be wiped out by the common cold like martians in War of the Worlds.

I believe…that thousands of years ago in a former life I was a one-armed Siberian shaman.

I believe that mankind’s destiny lies in the stars. I believe that candy really did taste better when I was a kid, that it’s aerodynamically impossible for a bumble bee to fly, that light is a wave and a particle, that there’s a cat in a box somewhere who’s alive and dead at the same time (although if they don’t ever open the box to feed it it’ll eventually just be two different kinds of dead), and that there are stars in the universe billions of years older than the universe itself.

I believe in a personal god who cares about me and worries and oversees everything I do. I believe in an impersonal god who set the universe in motion and went off to hang with her girlfriends and doesn’t even know that I’m alive. I believe in an empty and godless universe of causal chaos, background noise, and sheer blind luck.

I believe that anyone who says sex is overrated just hasn’t done it properly. I believe that anyone who claims to know what’s going on will lie about the little things too.

I believe in absolute honesty and sensible social lies. I believe in a woman’s right to choose, a baby’s right to live, that while all human life is sacred there’s nothing wrong with the death penalty if you can trust the legal system implicitly, and that no one but a moron would ever trust the legal system.

I believe that life is a game, that life is a cruel joke, and that life is what happens when you’re alive and that you might as well lie back and enjoy it.”

― Neil Gaiman, American Gods

Film View: “The Price”


Neil Gaiman’s “The Price”

“Wanderers and vagabonds have brands that are on the walls, trees and doors to inform of his ilk a little about the people who live in the houses and farms as they go on their travels. I think cats must leave similar signs. How else explain what the cats that appear on our door during the year, hungry, infested with fleas and abandoned? “

A short animation based on the story by Neil Gaiman “The Price”, published in “Smoke and Mirrors”.