“Life In Squares”

“Life In Squares” is one British Show I am dreaming about coming to the States. Counting the days, months, and year(s).
A friend from England has given Life In Squares, a three part series, RAVE Reviews.

Myself being an anglophile, I am addicted to Virginia Woolf, Leonard Woolf, Vanessa Bell [Virginia’s Sister], and the many who belonged to the Bloomsbury Group. They were England’s Algonquin Roundtable [often referred to as the Vicious Circle], with Dorothy Parker as its most famous member, and during their time they were the prime of writing and critical thinking. The same is very true of the Bloomsbury Group. As Woody Allen liked to say, “I’d never join a club that would allow a person like me to become a member.” Well, I would love to be a member of any club who had Virginia Woolf and/or Dorothy Parker as a member.

Virginia Woolf is one of the most fascinating persons and writers. She was born two years after my grandmother, the one I knew as a child. I thought that was quite wild to think they grew up in the same time period. She would have known her when she was alive. Not personally, but through her presence in the world.

“The Bloomsbury Group was an influential group of associated English writers, intellectuals, philosophers and artists, the best known members of which included Virginia Woolf, John Maynard Keynes, E. M. Forster and Lytton Strachey. This loose collective of friends and relatives lived, worked or studied together near Bloomsbury, London, during the first half of the 20th century. According to a certain statement, “although its members denied being a group in any formal sense, they were united by an abiding belief in the importance of the arts.” Their works and outlook deeply influenced literature, aesthetics, criticism, and economics as well as modern attitudes towards feminism, pacifism, and sexuality.” [help from Wikipedia]

E.M. Forster wrote some of the most brilliant of books, several turned into films. Passage to India, A Room With A View, Howard’s End, and Maurice. All brilliant. If you find a chance to view any of these films or read Forster’s books, you will not be disappointed.


“Life In Squares” BBC Two – Trailer

A three part BBC Two drama about the lives and loves of the extraordinary Bloomsbury Group.

http://bbc.in/1Hww6c6
For the FULL ACCOUNT GO TO LINK ABOVE…

bloomsbury group virginia vanessa and duncan

Young stars filmed the new BBC Two drama about the lives and loves of the extraordinary Bloomsbury Group.

Life In Squares, an intimate and emotional drama about the revolutionary Bloomsbury Group – a collection of friends and lovers who had an extraordinary and enduring influence on 20th century culture.

Life In Squares dramatizes the close and often fraught relationship between sisters, Vanessa Bell and Virginia Woolf, and Vanessa’s sexually complicated alliance with gay artist Duncan Grant as they, and their group of like-minded friends, navigate their way through love, sex and artistic life through the first half of the 20th century…

Starting in 1901 with the death of Queen Victoria, the drama tells the story of the young friends as they attempt to escape the shackles of Victorian England and embrace lives dedicated to creative and sexual freedom. The group, which coalesces around sisters Vanessa (Fox) and Virginia (Leonard), aspire to build a world of their own design, pursuing their passions and desires without constraint: a distinctive lifestyle in which they legendarily ‘lived in squares, painted in circles and loved in triangles’.

The drama unpicks the complex and entangled relationships between the sisters and their Bloomsbury contemporaries Duncan Grant, Lytton Strachey, Clive Bell and Maynard Keynes, and the turbulent legacy they unwittingly enacted on generations to come, in particular Vanessa and Duncan’s daughter Angelica.

The story of their early years is told alongside the later lives of Vanessa and Virginia (Best and McCormack), settled into marriage, motherhood and in Virginia’s case enjoying huge public acclaim, but struggling to reconcile themselves to the heartache of loss, betrayal and mental anguish.

Dubbed 20th century leaders of artistic and sexual freedom, the drama follows these inspirational women and their artistic peers as they face timeless dilemmas about romance, family, work and sex.

“Life In Squares gets under the skin of the Bloomsbury Group to lay bare the very human and emotional story of a group of people determined to find their own path in life. Locked in a perpetual struggle to reconcile their heads with their hearts, they loved and worked with great passion and forged lives that still resonate today.

“At heart, Life In Squares is about family – about the families we try to escape, the ones we end up creating and the different kinds of damage love can do…

Dragons Are Really Dragons!

Dragons Are Really Dragons

dragon_s-loyalty-award

A big smile and thank you to Ben Naga for this beautiful Dragon-related award. I would be giving this to him, if it were the other way around. Time tripped his way first.

I have to admit or release five facts about myself. Thinking of five relevant facts. What shall I choose, once I think of at least one it should help to begin the reveal. With some moments to think I hopefully will come up with something humorous while still relevant or maybe some thoughts or facts with a more serious content. We shall see what appears in the five spaces just below:

1. When I am stoned I love to expand on my thinking through talk, writing, listening to music, painting & watching a film, all at the same moment in time. Multitasking is wild & trippy.

2. I am Bipolar & do not call it a Disorder but a Gift. It has those moments that SUCK, also.

3. I started psychotherapy when I was a teenager & I forgot to stop; Hell, I need it. Not going to stop, EVER.

4. I started out living with Christians. I’ve since expanded the dimensions & believe in the Spiritual & Humanism. I am an Existentialist. Believe All Is Possible, even the Impossible, which is even more possible than the possible. I meditate frequently every day. Way too much Pressure builds up.

5. I am a lucid dreamer hunting for something or someone, but just haven’t figured it out yet. No guns involved, just searching.

I am also required to nominate between five and ten fellow writers. I have chosen five creators in the arts. It does say writers but I want to expand my list to include one photographer who happens to be a writer, also. So many ways to express the Arts. So, in no preferential order, my picks for the Dragon’s Loyalty Award:

1. John Orzehowski
2. Vampire Maman
3. The Writer Next Door
4. Elusive Trope
5. Who Is Bert

smaug-approves
====================================
http://dragon-story.wikia.com/wiki/Naga_Dragon

“The Known and the Unknown” – #2

a writer's word polished or rawThe Known and the Unknown – #2
Excerpts from the Essay “Fail Safe”
Written by Debbie Millman
Post by Jennifer Kiley
Post Sunday 27th July 2014
The Essay titled “Fail Safe”
Taken From Anthology
Look Both Ways: Illustrated Essays
on the Intersection of Life and Design

Debbie Millman is an Artist
Strategist & Interviewer

“Fail Safe” The Essay-Explores Existential Skills-Living With Uncertainty-Embracing The Unfamiliar-Allowing For Not Knowing-Cultivating What John Keats Famously Termed “Negative Capability”

psychedelic cat

The Known and the Unknown – #2

I dreamed of being
an artist and a writer,
but inasmuch as I knew
what I wanted,
I felt compelled
to consider what
was “reasonable”
in order
to safeguard
my economic future.

Even though
I wanted
what my best friend
once referred to as
“the whole wide world,”

I thought
it was prudent
to compromise.

I told myself
it was more
sensible to aspire
for success

that was
realistically
feasible

perhaps
even
failure-proof

It never
once occurred
to me
that I could
have it all.

All

ALL

blk & wht fluid abstract painting


“The Known and the Unknown” Part 2 – Jennifer Kiley

Remember

“Do What You LOVE

A Writer’s Diary: Virginia Woolf —Part #15

a writer's diary
Virginia Woolf – Part #15
Excerpts from Virginia Woolf
Created by Jennifer Kiley
Created 24th March 2014
Posted Sunday 8th June 2014
A WRITER’S DIARY

Virginia Woolf 1

Virginia Woolf

A Writer’s Diary
Virginia Woolf – Part #15

December 29th, 1940
Virginia Woolf at 58 yrs.

There are
moments
when
the sail
flaps.

Then,
being
a great
amateur
of the art
of life,

determined
to suck
my orange,
off,
like a wasp
if the blossom
I’m on
fades,
as it did
yesterday

I ride
across
the downs
to the cliffs.

A roll
of barbed
wire
is hooped
on the edge.

I rubbed
my mind
brisk
along
the
Newhaven
road.

Shabby
old maids
buying
groceries,

in that
desert road
with
the villas;
in the wet.

And
Newhaven
gashed.

But tire
the body
and
the mind
sleeps.

All desire
to write
diary
here
has
flagged.

What is
the right
antidote?

I must
sniff round.
I think
Mme.
de Sevigne.

Writing
to be
a daily
pleasure.

I detest
the hardness
of old age

I feel it.

I rasp.

I’m tart.

*       *       *       *       *       *       *

3 Months later on 28th March 1941 Virginia Woolf filled her coat pockets with
Stones, walked into the River Ouse near her home in Sussex and drowned herself.
Headlines stated she had disappeared but it was suspected she was dead. Three
weeks after she committed suicide by drowning, she was found. Leonard Woolf
had her cremated. Virginia Woolf’s ashes were buried under the intertwined Elm
Trees, nicknamed “Virginia and Leonard” by them, at Monk’s House, their Summer
Home. Both their homes in London had been destroyed by bombs during World
War II.  Leonard Woolf, Virginia’s husband, was devastated. She left a note for
him and one for her sister Vanessa Bell. There was a huge outpouring from
friends, family, acquaintances, strangers, fans and admirers who were send-
ing their condolences. It was a shock to all, the loss of Virginia Woolf.

At the bottom of post I will leave a copy of the suicide note
Virginia Woolf wrote for her husband Leonard Woolf.

These are the last passages from Virginia Woolf’s A Writer’s Diary, BUT ONLY TEMPORARILY.

I will be presenting further excerpts
from Virginia Woolf’s A Writer’s Diary in the near future.

Thank You For Following Her Brilliant Words as her Gift to All of Us.

THANK YOU VIRGINIA WOOLF FOR BEING SO GENEROUS.
WE HAVE YOUR GIFTS TO LEARN FROM & WE ARE ABLE
TO ABSORB FROM THE DEPTH OF YOUR KNOWLEDGE, YOUR
BRILLIANCE & YOUR SENSITIVITY. I KNOW I AM GRATEFUL
TO HAVE FOUND YOU. YOU ARE IMPORTANT TO ME. I FEEL
THE PAIN YOU SUFFERED & HOPE YOU HAVE FOUND PEACE.

Virginia Woolf's Monk's House Garden

Virginia Woolf’s Monk’s House Garden

virginia woolf 3

Virginia Woolf


Erik Satie: Gnossienne No. 1, 2, 3

 *       *       *       *       *       *       *

Virginia Woolf’s Handwritten Suicide Note to Her Husband Leonard
A Painful & Poignant Farewell [28th March 1941]

Dearest, I feel certain that I am going mad again. I feel we can’t go through another of those terrible times. And I shan’t recover this time. I begin to hear voices, and I can’t concentrate. So I am doing what seems the best thing to do. You have given me the greatest possible happiness. You have been in every way all that anyone could be. I don’t think two people could have been happier ’til this terrible disease came. I can’t fight any longer. I know that I am spoiling your life, that without me you could work. And you will I know. You see I can’t even write this properly. I can’t read. What I want to say is I owe all the happiness of my life to you. You have been entirely patient with me and incredibly good. I want to say that—everybody knows it. If anybody could have saved me it would have been you. Everything has gone from me but the certainty of your goodness. I can’t go on spoiling your life any longer. I don’t think two people could have been happier than we have been. V.

*       *       *       *       *       *       *

A Writer’s Diary: Virginia Woolf —Part #13

a writer's diary
Virginia Woolf – Part #13
Excerpts from Virginia Woolf

Created by Jennifer Kiley

Post Sunday 25th May 2014

Virginia Woolf 1

Virginia Woolf

A Writer’s Diary
Virginia Woolf – Part #13

June 14th, 1925
Woolf at 43 yrs.

A disgraceful
Confession —

this is
Sunday
morning

and
just
after ten,

and
here I am
sitting down
to write diary

and
not fiction
or reviews,

without
any excuse,
except
the state
of my mind.

After
finishing those
two books,
though,

one can’t
concentrate
directly
on a
new one;

and

then
the letters,

the talk,

the reviews,

all serve
to enlarge
the pupil
of my mind
more
and
more.

I’ve written
6 little stories,

scrambled
them down
untidily

and
have
thought out,

perhaps
too clearly,

To the Lighthouse.

June 27th 1925
Woolf at 43 yrs.

…But while
I try
to write,

I am
making up
To the Lighthouse

the sea
is to be
heard
all through
it.

I have
an idea
that I will
invent a new
name
for my
books

to supplant
“novel.”

A new ___
by
Virginia
Woolf.

But what?

Elegy?

Virginia Woolf's Monk's House Garden

Virginia Woolf’s Monk’s House Garden

 

virginia woolf 3

Virginia Woolf


Erik Satie: Gnossienne No. 1, 2, 3

A Writer’s Diary: Virginia Woolf —Part #12

a writer's diary
Virginia Woolf – Part #12
Excerpts from Virginia Woolf
Created by Jennifer Kiley
Created 24th March 2014
Posted Sunday 18th May 2014
A WRITER’S DIARY

Virginia Woolf 1

Virginia Woolf

A Writer’s Diary
Virginia Woolf – Part #12

October 25th, 1920
Woolf at 38 yrs.

Why is life
so tragic;

so like
a little strip
of pavement
over
an abyss?

I look down;

I feel giddy;

I wonder how
I am ever
to walk
to the end.

But why
do I feel
this:

Now
that I
say it
I don’t
feel it.

The fire
burns;

we are
going
to hear
the
Beggar’s Opera.

Only it lies
about me;

I can’t keep
my eyes shut.

It’s a feeling
of impotence;

of cutting
no ice.

Here I sit
at Richmond,

and like
a lantern
stood
in the
middle
of a field

my light
goes up
in darkness.

Melancholy
diminishes
as I write.

Why then
don’t
I write it
down oftener?

Well,
one’s
vanity
forbids.

I want
to appear
a success
even
to myself.

Yet
I don’t
get to
the bottom
of it.

 

Virginia Woolf's Monk's House Garden

Virginia Woolf’s Monk’s House Garden

virginia woolf 3

Virginia Woolf


Erik Satie: Gnossienne No. 1, 2, 3