“Updating Philosophies”

“Updating Philosophies” from Navigate

Process is fascinating. There is an art to the way that things are made. Oftentimes we find ourselves so enraptured by a work of art that a form of mysticism envelops the creator. In our society this has become something worth idolizing, something artists feel the need to aspire to.

Well, we’re not interested in myth. We’re interested in people. In actual people who have incredible talents and the hard work they put in to achieve their results.

Often this secretive artistic path is put on a pedestal. We would like to offer something different to admire: the realistic struggle through which people can create great things.

Expression is difficult. It is of our belief that true greatness comes from vulnerability. The honesty that lies within the creative process provides us with empowering perspectives. To know the challenges faced by an artist and the fortitude needed to overcome them is to celebrate the human spirit.

Cern is an artist living and working in Brooklyn, New York. His ideas are expressed in many artistic forms, including murals, which can be found in major cities all over the world.

cernesto.com
Twitter: @cernymi
Instagram: @cernesto

“American Bonsai”

“American Shokunin” from Ryan Bush

Shokunin (Sho-koo-neen) is a Japanese word used to describe an individual that aspires to become a master in their particular craft or art form. Ryan Neil falls firmly into this description, as he has been practicing the art of Bonsai for nearly two decades. In this short film, we get a glimpse at the broader thinking behind a professional American Bonsai practitioner, as well as some of the inherent challenges and aspirations that come along with the pursuit for bonsai mastery in America.

Join the movement.

“The Universe”

“The Universe” by Ian Watt

A young man takes his first leap into what it means to wonder and philosophize, as he imaginatively renders his unique thought experiences in visual form. The film examines what it means to truly be; not only to merely exist, but to engage, reflect, and respond to the world around us.

(In order to fully experience the film, I highly recommend reading the preface below)

Written and Directed by Ian Watt
Produced by Creator Collective in association with Culture Creator
Starring Alec Mangum

Preface:
“This film explores some major concepts, but two of them are simple: places and spaces. Places are merely physical locations, with often no meaning attached to them. However, a simple, empty room can be formed into a space; turned into a place of meeting, creativity, innovation, and community. Places are often beautiful, awe-inspiring, breathtaking, but they only become spaces when we engage with them. When we experience beauty, peace, or joy from a place, our reflections and responses to the place are what create an experience, as well as the emotions that we feel.

Here’s the problem, when we reflect during an experience, or bring pre-conceived notions to an experience, we arent truly experiencing. Reflection must exclusively follow experience.

This film is about experiences of the mind. Places of the mind are merely thoughts, ideas, concepts. When we engage with the places of our own minds, we create spaces. Spaces to dream, to think, to create, to become. In this film, a young man engages with some big concepts for the very first time, and as an audience we get to see the spaces he creates and explores. And with that, we get to explore alongside him, and ask ourselves the very questions that he does.

With that, please enjoy The Universe.”

Escape

ESCAPE

“Fiction can show you a different world. It can take you somewhere you’ve never been. Once you’ve visited other worlds, like those who ate fairy fruit, you can never be entirely content with the world that you grew up in. Discontent is a good thing: discontented people can modify and improve their worlds, leave them better, leave them different.

And while we’re on the subject, I’d like to say a few words about escapism. I hear the term bandied about as if it’s a bad thing. As if “escapist” fiction is a cheap opiate used by the muddled and the foolish and the deluded, and the only fiction that is worthy, for adults or for children, is mimetic fiction, mirroring the worst of the world the reader finds herself in.

If you were trapped in an impossible situation, in an unpleasant place, with people who meant you ill, and someone offered you a temporary escape, why wouldn’t you take it? And escapist fiction is just that: fiction that opens a door, shows the sunlight outside, gives you a place to go where you are in control, are with people you want to be with(and books are real places, make no mistake about that); and more importantly, during your escape, books can also give you knowledge about the world and your predicament, give you weapons, give you armour: real things you can take back into your prison. Skills and knowledge and tools you can use to escape for real.

As JRR Tolkien reminded us, the only people who inveigh against escape are jailers.”

― Neil Gaiman

neil_gaiman_story_illustration_by_tim baker

Neil Gaiman story illustration by Tim Baker