Film Review: Words and Pictures

poster words and pictures
Film Review: Words and Pictures

Review by Jennifer Kiley

Post Friday 12th December 2014

clive & juliette words and pictures 1

An unexpected joy to find a film that actually is brilliant and exceeds the expectations. A high school literary teacher vs the new art teacher. Clive Owen is excellent in his performance as a disappointed alcoholic who feels his flame for writing has gone out. He takes it out on his students at first. But once the new art teacher hits the scene and his job is threatened because he is not doing his job very well and has lost his enthusiasm, the film picks up a war of what is more valuable words or pictures.

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It is a love story and a lesson in how to respect others. Students and teachers both learn these lessons the hard way.

Juliet Binnoche is a brilliant artist. She creates her own paintings for the film. And they are intensely profound and beautifully deep. The contest brings a spirit to the participants. It puts a fire in their bellies all around.

It’s a struggle but a worthy one. I highly recommend this film to anyone who is into art and language, love and recovery. I loved every moment the film was on the screen. I didn’t want it to end.

Movie Trailer - Words and Pictures

Appears on Expats Post 27th October 2014

“I Am One of the Searchers”

a writer's word polished or raw

“I Am One of the Searchers”

By James Kavanaugh

Post by Jennifer Kiley

Posted on Sunday 15th June 2014

water ocean gif

sun rays into forest“I Am One of the Searchers”  There are, I believe, millions of us. We are not unhappy, but neither are we really content. We continue to explore life, hoping to uncover its ultimate secret. We continue to explore ourselves, hoping to understand. We like to walk along the beach, we are drawn by the ocean, taken by its power, its unceasing motion, its mystery and unspeakable beauty. We like forests and mountains, deserts and hidden rivers, and the lonely cities as well. Our sadness is as much a part of our lives as is our laughter. To share our sadness with one we love is perhaps as great a joy as we can know. Unless it be to share our laughter.

sunrise in the mountainsWe searchers are ambitious only for life itself, for everything beautiful it can provide.Most of all we love and want to be loved. We want to live in a relationship that will not impede our wandering, not prevent our search, nor lock us in prison walls; that will take us for what little we have to give. We do not want to have to prove ourselves to another or compete for love.

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For wanderers, dreamers, and lovers,

for lonely men and women

who dare to ask from life everything

good and beautiful. It is for those who

are too gentle to live among wolves.

— James Kavanaugh

[There Are Men Too Gentle To Live Among Wolves]

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John Steinbeck: Six Tips on Writing

a writer's word - day title sundayJohn Steinbeck: Six Tips on Writing
Post Created by Jk the secret keeper
Illustrated by j. kiley
Post Created On Saturday 21st September 2013
Posted On Sunday 22nd September 2013

A Writer’s Word
john steinbeck

John Steinbeck Tip #1

 

Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.

 

John Steinbeck Tip #2

 

Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.

 

John Steinbeck Tip #3

 

Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.

 

John Steinbeck Tip #4

 

If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.

 

John Steinbeck Tip #5

 

Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.

John Steinbeck Tip #6

 

If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.

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Steinbeck issued the following statement after receiving the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1963,

 “If there is a magic in story writing, and I am convinced there is, no one has ever been able to reduce it to a recipe that can be passed from one person to another. The formula seems to lie solely in the aching urge of the writer to convey something he feels important to the reader. If the writer has that urge, he may sometimes, but by no means always, find the way to do it. You must perceive the excellence that makes a good story good or the errors that makes a bad story. For a bad story is only an ineffective story.” — John Steinbeck

 

John Steinbeck — Pulitzer Prize winner, Nobel laureate, author of “East of Eden,” gave an excellent interview published in the Fall 1975 issue of The Paris Review.

[Thank You to Brain Pickings]

Writers Interview with Chandler & Fleming BBC

Writers Interview with Chandler & Fleming BBC
Creators of Philip Marlowe & James Bond 007
Post Created by Jk the secret keeper
Created Sunday 11th August 2013
Posted on Thursday 15th August 2013
TALK THURSDAY

Raymond Chandler and Ian Fleming

Raymond Chandler and Ian Fleming

I grew up watching old movies, detective films with Nick and Nora Charles with William Powell and Myrna Loy, Humphrey Bogart in the Maltese Falcon as Sam Spade and Raymond Chandler’s detective Philip Marlowe played by Humphrey Bogart in The Big Sleep. Lauren Bacall joined Bogie in this one, also. I have seen The Big Sleep more times than I can count. It is a brilliant film and should be required viewing for any film student, no matter what area in the film media they are studying to work in.

The Real Philip Marlowe  1086x1097

The Real Philip Marlowe [click to enlarge]

James Bond 007, who has not heard of him? Ian Fleming, a spy during the time England needed him most, turned into a writer of intrigue and action adventure. I started watching James Bond 007 from the beginning in Dr. No. with Sean Connery. As with Dr. Who, I love Tom Baker. He was my first Dr. Who, as Sean Connery was my first James Bond 007. And Humphrey was my one and only Philip Marlowe.

Ian Fleming Comments About James Bond

Ian Fleming Comments About James Bond

For my first James Bond 007 film, Dr. No, my date thought it would be fun, we were young teenagers who had to be dropped off at the theatre, he wanted to sneak into the movie theatre. It was a total bust. It really doesn’t work. I’d never done it before, so not then and never back then did it ever work. It is so embarrassing to be asked to leave. Now, you can wander into different theatres in those multiplexes, but I don’t enjoy them anymore. I enjoy films at home.

Cannot handle theatres. Though I love them, my body does not feel the comfort of the experience. I use to be 7th row from front, in the center. Always arrived early, if with friend or alone. It was the best seat in the house. I didn’t miss a thing on the screen. Now the theatres have changed and become so uncomfortable. You have to wait in a large mob scene, at least at our local multiplex, before you can get into your theatre, and the whole experience just isn’t the same.

For Bond Lovers Only

For Bond Lovers Only

I like pause on the DVD/Blu-ray. Getting snacks you suddenly have a craving for without paying an exorbitant price for a soda or candy, whatever. Just being able to say something to your S/O, so you don’t interrupt the film, you have pause for that, also. Actually, my S/O gets up more often than I do and she’s great at making the sudden need for popcorn or liquid refills of ice and Arizona Iced Tea. Plus our animals love to have us with them and we love them snuggling with us or just feeling them near.

Back to why I am telling you all this. The Soundcloud I am presenting today is opened up by an announcer, who speaks for a short time, but then he turns things over to Raymond Chandler and Ian Fleming to talk amongst themselves. They talk like old friends and by the end of the interview you go away with the feeling they would hang out together often if they didn’t come from different countries, the US and Great Britain.

Scene From Russia With Love [Robert Shawn Plays the Spectre Assassin  732x508

Scene From Russia With Love [Robert Shawn Plays the Spectre Assassin]

This recording is the only known recording left of Raymond Chandler’s voice. According to the announcer, he’s ingested a touch of the liquid formula, but it doesn’t interfere with a clarity to the interview. Technically, I feel it is a talk rather than anyone interviewing anyone else. It is enjoyable to listen in on two such well known writers who were well established during their time and remembered by those who follow Philip Marlowe and James Bond 007. Sit back and enjoy the listen. It isn’t necessary to stop everything if you don’t have that kind of time, but listen as you do mindless work where you don’t have to pay close attention to what you’re doing and instead focus on these two legends speaking openly with each other about writing and all their experiences.

A month after this interview in 1958, seven months later Raymond Chandler died. So, it is a momentous occasion to have these last words recorded by him with such an illustrious partner as Ian Fleming. Interesting to me, Raymond Chandler was born on my birthday. A writer I would have gotten along with quite fine, in all his grumpiness and love of cats. I feel the same way, less the overall grumpiness, that I do occasionally in sudden Bipolar outbursts and then the mood fades away just as quickly. Only found this information out about Raymond Chandler by discovering this Soundcloud through Brainpickings.

BBC Archives Chandler and Fleming July 10th 1058

BBC Archives Chandler and Fleming July 10th 1958

Read the short paragraph below the Soundcloud for a few more details to fill in the story about Raymond Chandler and Ian Fleming. And do ENJOY a good listen to these two grand writers who created such amazing figures for all to be draw into with awe, enjoyment, and intrigue. I, also, include a newspaper clipping. It is fine description of Raymond Chandler’s more intimate thoughts about his life, his writing, his wife, and how he felt his life turned out. It is an intimate look inside of Raymond Chandler’s thinking. It is about the letters he left behind. He destroy many but those that survived said a great deal about the writer and creator of Philip Marlowe but it talks about his aspirations.

Remember about the announcer. He talks a bit but let it go if you will. You might find something interesting in what he has to say. Written by Jennifer Kiley

Interview with Raymond Chandler and Ian Fleming BBC July 1958

Raymond Chandler’s great detective is Phillip Marlowe.

Ian Fleming’s greatest character is James Bond 007.

Raymond Chandler (July 23, 1888–March 26, 1959) endures as one of the most celebrated novelists and screenwriters in literary history, an oracle of insight on the written word, a lovable grump dispensing delightfully curmudgeonly advice on editorial manners, and a hopeless cat-lover. In July of 1958, to mark the publication of Chandler’s last book, Playback, BBC brought Chandler and Ian Fleming together on the air. Fleming and the BBC broadcaster producing the program picked up Chandler at 11 A.M. on the day of the interview and even though they “found his voice slurred with whiskey,” the broadcast went quite well. Seven months later, Chandler died. This discussion, which covers heroes and villains — Fleming’s James Bond and Chandler’s Philip Marlowe — and the relationship between author and character, is believed to be the only surviving recording of the author’s voice.

Review on Chandler's Letters. Brilliant. A Must Read  Remember to Click on Image to Enlarge onto Another Page   793x1532

Review on Chandler’s Letters. Brilliant. A Must Read

The Words — FILM FRIDAY

The Words
Post Created by Jk the secret keeper
Illustrated by j. kiley
Review by Roger Ebert & Jennifer Kiley
Post Created on 5th August 2013
Posted On 9th August 2013
FILM FRIDAY

dedicated to roger ebert film friday

title black background  the words

5 stars

There’s more than one way to take a life.

movie-poster-the-word book coverThe Words (2012)

Roger Ebert
September 5, 2012

Almost every word Ernest Hemingway wrote in the years immediately before 1922 was lost by his first wife Hadley, who packed the pages in a briefcase and lost it on a train. Hardly an American lit student lives who has not heard this story.

The-Words-bradley alone with briefcase

Hemingway’s lost prose lives on, in a sense, in the movie “The Words,” which opens with a writer named Clayton Hammond (Dennis Quaid) reading from his new novel in a Manhattan bookstore. But hold on. Don’t get ahead of the story. I know you’re thinking Hammond’s book is actually the long-lost Hemingway manuscript. But the movie adds another level. His book is about another novelist who finds the lost briefcase in a Paris antique shop.

The-Words-briefcaseMost of “The Words” is about that novelist. His name is Rory Jansen (Bradley Cooper), and he has a wife named Dora (Zoe Saldana). Dora is a famous name among novelist’s wives, but never mind. Her purpose here is to shoehorn a beautiful woman into the movie, which includes two others: Celia (Nora Arnezeder), a Parisian mistress, who is the one who leaves the briefcase on the train, and Danielle (Olivia Wilde), a graduate student who falls for Clayton Hammond at his reading.

The-Words-Australian-movie-posterThe original novelist at the beginning of this series of events is known only as The Old Man (Jeremy Irons), and he is seen only when already Old. If you’re thinking of The Old Man and the Sea, don’t blame me. After Rory Jansen finds the novel and publishes it as his own, he finds himself in the park one day, having a conversation with The Old Man, who tells him the story of how he came to write the novel and lose it.

the words old manI doubt if either one of us could pass a quiz on that plot. It’s a level too many and sidesteps a more promising approach: What if the movie were about the real Ernest Hemingway discovering that his lost manuscript had been found and published by a stranger? That would eliminate the need for the Dennis Quaid and Olivia Wilde characters, provide an opening for some juicy Hemingway dialogue, and create an excuse for a passionate affair between Hemingway and the succulent Dora. Of course you’d need some time compression, because the various events in the movie seem to span perhaps 90 years.

the-words-with manuscript old paperThe Words,” written and directed by Brian Klugman and Lee Sternthal, may sound like a movie about literature, but it isn’t. It ingeniously avoids quoting more than a few words from the Hemingwayesque novel, and although Clayton Hammond reads more from his novel, there’s no suggestion that we’re dealing with the Son of Hemingway, or even the Cousin Of. The movie does however slyly leave open the possibility that his novel is the story of his own life.

words-entering manuscript on to laptopWhat does work are the performances, especially Jeremy Irons as The Old Man. He’s not as angry about Jansen’s plagiarism, as you might assume, and indeed the real Hemingway considered his lost manuscripts “juvenile work.” (In life, Hadley did save a few carbons, one of which was the short story “Up in Michigan,” which is a work of genius. We can only wonder what was lost.)

the-words-talking to old man in greenhouseWatching the movie, I enjoyed the settings, the periods and the acting. I can’t go so far as to say I cared about the story, particularly after it became clear that its structure was too clever by half. There’s also an appearance by J.K. Simmons as Jansen’s father, not a very necessary character, but it’s funny how often you see Simmons playing someone in a movie and
wish the whole movie was about him.

The-Words-manuscipt entering into laptopTHE WORDS
REVIEW WRITTEN BY JENNIFER KILEY
SATURDAY 4th AUGUST 2013

A GREAT REVIEW BY ROGER EBERT AND FACTS I DIDN’T CONSIDER WHILE WATCHING THE FILM MYSELF. I AM AN AVID HEMINGWAY FAN BUT WAS UNAWARE OF THE LOST MANUSCRIPT. KNOWING THAT NOW DOES ADD DIMENSION TO THE VIEWING OF ‘THE WORDS.’ I AGREE WITH ROGER EBERT THAT THE CHARACTERS DENNIS QUAID AND OLIVIA WILDE ARE PRETTY UNNECESSARY TO THE TELLING OF THE STORY. THEIR ONLY VALUE SEEMS TO BE SETTING UP THE PREMISE OF ONE WRITER WRITING ABOUT ANOTHER WRITER FINDING THE MISSING MANUSCRIPT.

the-words-2012 words form the bust of bradley cooperONE IS NOT SURE WHILE WATCHING ‘THE WORD’ WHAT IS THE REALITY AND WHAT IS THE FICTION. ARE ANY OF THE CHARACTERS IN THE FILM REAL. MAYBE DENNIS QUAID IS THE ONLY REAL CHARACTER TELLING THE REST OF THE STORY IN HIS BOOK. AT THE VERY BEGINNING OF THE FILM YOU SEE A PROMINENTLY VIEWED BOOK WITH THE TITLE ‘THE WORDS.’ IT DOES SET OFF THE FILM ON A JOURNEY TO FIGURE OUT WHAT IS HAPPENING.I FELT THE BACK STORY OF THE CHARACTERS FROM THE FAR LONG AGO PAST IS RATHER BORING. THAT COULD BE PULLED TOGETHER AND REFERRED IN A MORE MINIMAL WAY.

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THE MOST INTERESTING PARTS OF THE FILM EVOLVE AROUND THE BRADLEY COOPER CHARACTER. I FOUND MYSELF MUCH MORE INTERESTED IN WHAT WAS HAPPENING TO HIS LIFE, HIS DECISIONS, HIS RELATIONSHIPS AND HIS DIALOGUE, ESPECIALLY WITH THE OLD MAN PLAYED BY JEREMY IRONS. IRONS WAS BRILLIANT. COMPARING THIS ALL TO HEMINGWAY’S MISSING MANUSCRIPT & THE OLD MAN BEING A CUTE REFERENCE TO HEMINGWAY’S BOOK ‘THE OLD MAN AND THE SEA’ WOULD HAVE BEEN AN INTERESTING INCLUSION IN THE FILM IF THE DIRECTOR AND SCREENWRITER HAD BEEN ASTUTE ENOUGH TO USE THAT IN THEIR PREMISE. IT WOULD HAVE DEFINITELY IMPROVED THE OVERALL INTRIGUE.

the words center of bradley's faceI REALLY FOUND THIS FILM ABSORBING AND HAVE WATCHED SEVERAL TIMES. READING ROGER EBERT’S REVIEW, AS I STATED, MAKES THE FILM EVEN MORE INTRIGUING. TOO BAD ROGER DIDN’T HAVE INPUT WITH THE SCREENWRITER. MAYBE THEY SHOULD HAVE DONE MORE RESEARCH AND INCLUDED THE REFERENCE TO HEMINGWAY OR MAYBE THEY KNEW AND DIDN’T GET THAT IT WOULD HAVE BEEN AN IMPORTANT ELEMENT TO INCLUDE IN THE STORYLINE.

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I, FOR ONE, WOULD HAVE FOUND THAT FASCINATING IF THE LOST MANUSCRIPT HAD ACTUALLY BEEN ERNEST HEMINGWAY’S,THE ONE HIS WIFE CARELESSLY LOST ON HIM. HOW FRUSTRATING IS THAT AND HOW IMPORTANT THAT WOULD HAVE PUMPED UP THE WHOLE DEPTH OF THE STORY. THE WHOLE FILM WOULD HAVE TAKEN ON A COMPLETELY DIFFERENT AURA.

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JUST THE SAME, THE FILM IS WORTHY OF BEING SEEN IN JUST THE WAY IT IS PORTRAYED. I HIGHLY RECOMMEND IT. WRITERS, IN PARTICULAR, WILL ENJOY THE DEBATE IN THEIR OWN MIND, HOW ETHICAL OVERALL WAS THE DECISION BRADLEY COOPER’S CHARACTER MADE. SEE THE FILM ‘THE WORDS’ AND ENJOY AN INTRIGUING CONCEPT FOR A STORY. YOU WILL NOT BE DISAPPOINTED. I ENJOYED EVERY TIME I VIEWED ‘THE WORDS.’ Written by Jennifer Kiley

the-words-movie-poster-as book coverCast: ‘The Words’

Bradley Cooper as Rory
Dennis Quaid as Clayton
Zoe Saldana as Dora
Olivia Wilde as Danielle
Jeremy Irons as Old Man

The-Words-Movie-jeremy back of head bradley smiling at old man

Written and directed by

Brian Klugman
Lee Sternthal

the_words_the face of a man with hesitant ethicsDrama, Thriller, 96 minutes

Rated PG-13 for brief strong language and smoking

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The Words – Official Trailer (2012) [HD] Bradley Cooper

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The Words Trailer 2 Official 2012 [HD 1080] – Bradley Cooper, Zoe Saldana

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Myths of Fixed Personalities: Violent Rebellion Part 1

a divider for post no. 5 love fav new one

Myths of Fixed Personalities
Violent Rebellion Part 1
Against the Myths of Fixed Personality
Written by Anais Nin in 4 Parts
Post Created by Jk the secret keeper
Created Friday 12th July 2013
Illustrated by j. Kiley
Posted on Sunday 14th July 2013
A WRITER’S WORDS SUNDAY

myths of fixed personalities by j. kiley (c) jennifer kiley 2013

Remember-Remember V for Vendetta Soundtrack — Dario Marianelli

QUOTATION on REBELLION:

“…it’s just another one of those things I don’t understand: everyone impresses upon you how unique you are, encouraging you to cultivate your individuality while at the same time trying to squish you and everyone else into the same ridiculous mould. It’s an artist’s right to rebel against the world’s stupidity.” ― E.A. Bucchianeri, Brushstrokes of a Gadfly

a divider for post no. 5 love fav new one

Author’s Corner With Shawn MacKenzie.

the secret keeper:

a divider for post no. 5 love fav new one
A marvelous post on author extraordinaire, Shawn MacKenzie. Thank you Niamh Clune and ontheplumtree. It is a pleasure to reblog this post of “Author’s Corner.” Well, done. [added this edited version of my comment from “on the plum tree”]. A great post Niamh. Loved your tales Shawn of discovering the Dragon in a serendipitous way. Those magical used book stores carry such treasures. I do believe Dragon Green was sitting up wondering and waiting for your arrival. “Where is that little girl. She was supposed to be here hours and possibly days ago. Ah, there she is. Now I will work my wonders on her. She will understand me. They told me she would.” And there you were, taking book in hand and from that day forward your destiny was forged. You have tried other endeavors. Playwright extraordinaire. I love your plays. But that was a different time. Now you are immersed with Dragon lore and mythical explorations and all sorts of stories needing to be told. But Dragons will be foremost in your mind. They chose you and you chose them. Either way you are meant for the other. As a writer, your brilliance shines through, your precision is excellent, and your imagination soars throughout the universe. Now you have taken on the Editor’s Corner, where you are teaching other writers, professional and novice, the inner workings of writing, so that it’s appearance is fleshed out with more accuracy. Giving valuable direction to us all. It is an enjoyment to read each week, so informative, and served with a (pardon the expression from someone I love from my childhood,) “spoonful of sugar, which helps the medicine go down in the most delightful way.” Well, done Niamh, choosing Shawn MacKenzie as your “Author’s Corner” author célèbre. She is most deserving of the attention and has a great deal more magic up her sleeve from short stories to novels. When you wrote, Niamh: “Shawn is no ordinary writer of prose. She crafts sentences, weaving them with natural flair whilst introducing the unusual. Her brilliance of mind and wit shines through everything she does.” A most accurate statement, indeed. I will second that. Not biased much, just appreciative of a true “Wildean” wit who is a true contrarian, too shy, however, to shine the light on herself, though she deserves the brightest light of all. So thank you for doing this for her. Jk the secret keeper
4p dragon-blue john lennon quote
a divider for post no. 5 love fav new one

Originally posted on Plum Tree Books Blog:

A favourite of Plum Tree Books is Shawn MacKenzie. You might all know her for her great editorial posts. But did you know, she is an expert on dragons and a brilliant writer in her own right? Shawn is no ordinary writer of prose. She crafts sentences, weaving them with natural flair whilst introducing the unusual. Her brilliance of mind and wit shines through everything she does. Great to have you here, Shawn.

Author’s Corner

by Shawn MacKENZIE

Hang out On the Plum Tree and you may know me from the Editor’s Corner. However, you may not know that there is actual authorial experience backing up all that pedantry. And so, at Niamh’s invitation, I’m delighted to introduce you to my fictional side, particularly my books on Dragons.dragon heeperdragon
As every dracophile knows, all talk of Dragons must begin with a story. They insist – and you don’t want to cross…

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